salts


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salt

 (sôlt)
n.
1. A usually whitish crystalline solid, chiefly sodium chloride, used extensively in ground or granulated form as a food seasoning and preservative. Also called common salt, table salt.
2. An ionic chemical compound formed by replacing all or part of the hydrogen ions of an acid with metal ions or other cations.
3. salts Any of various mineral salts used as laxatives or cathartics.
4. salts Smelling salts.
5. often salts Epsom salts.
6. An element that gives flavor or zest.
7. Sharp lively wit.
8. Informal A sailor, especially when old or experienced.
9. A saltcellar.
adj.
1. Containing or filled with salt: a salt spray; salt tears.
2. Having a salty taste or smell: breathed the salt air.
3. Preserved in salt or a salt solution: salt mackerel.
4.
a. Flooded with seawater.
b. Found in or near such a flooded area: salt grasses.
tr.v. salt·ed, salt·ing, salts
1. To add, treat, season, or sprinkle with salt.
2. To cure or preserve by treating with salt or a salt solution.
3. To provide salt for (deer or cattle).
4. To add zest or liveliness to: salt a lecture with anecdotes.
5. To give an appearance of value to by fraudulent means, especially to place valuable minerals in (a mine) for the purpose of deceiving.
Phrasal Verbs:
salt away
To put aside; save.
salt out
To separate (a dissolved substance) by adding salt to the solution.
Idioms:
salt of the earth
1. A person or group considered as embodying simplicity and moral integrity.
2. Archaic A person or group considered the best or most worthy part of society.
worth (one's) salt
Efficient and capable.

[Middle English, from Old English sealt; see sal- in Indo-European roots.]

SALT

 (sôlt)
abbr.
Strategic Arms Limitation Talks

salts

(sɔːlts)
pl n
1. (Medicine) med any of various mineral salts, such as magnesium sulphate or sodium sulphate, for use as a cathartic
2. (Pharmacology) short for smelling salts
3. like a dose of salts informal very fast
Translations

salts

[sɔːlts] npl (Med) → sali mpl
References in classic literature ?
March knew that experience was an excellent teacher, and when it was possible she left her children to learn alone the lessons which she would gladly have made easier, if they had not objected to taking advice as much as they did salts and senna.
All three give glimpses of the shops of grocers, block-makers, slop-sellers, and ship-chandlers, around the doors of which are generally to be seen, laughing and gossiping, clusters of old salts, and such other wharf-rats as haunt the Wapping of a seaport.
How could they find out that their tea and coffee, their sugar and flour, had been doctored; that their canned peas had been colored with copper salts, and their fruit jams with aniline dyes?
After threatening me thus, he gave me a very large dose of salts, telling me that I might remain in St.
I returned, sought the sponge on the washstand, the salts in my drawer, and once more retraced my steps.
As for my mother, when we had carried her up to the hamlet, a little cold water and salts and that soon brought her back again, and she was none the worse for her terror, though she still continued to deplore the balance of the money.
Their next business is from herbs, minerals, gums, oils, shells, salts, juices, seaweed, excrements, barks of trees, serpents, toads, frogs, spiders, dead men's flesh and bones, birds, beasts, and fishes, to form a composition, for smell and taste, the most abominable, nauseous, and detestable, they can possibly contrive, which the stomach immediately rejects with loathing, and this they call a vomit; or else, from the same store-house, with some other poisonous additions, they command us to take in at the orifice above or below (just as the physician then happens to be disposed) a medicine equally annoying and disgustful to the bowels; which, relaxing the belly, drives down all before it; and this they call a purge, or a clyster.
Madame de Granville had with her, by chance, a bottle of salts, which revived the colonel for a moment.
The sea, which till now had been white, was red, owing to the presence of salts of iron.
de la Tremouille approached him, and made him inhale some salts, which recalled him to life.
He could distinguish amid the perfumes of the roses and heliotropes in the flower-stands, the sharp and fragrant odor of volatile salts, and he noticed in one of the chased cups on the mantle-piece the countess's smelling-bottle, taken from its shagreen case, and exclaimed in a tone of uneasiness, as he entered, -- "My dear mother, have you been ill during my absence?
It donna smell," she whispered, thinking this was a great advantage which old salts had over fresh ones: they did you good without biting your nose.