sander


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Related to sander: Power sander

sand·er

 (săn′dər)
n.
One that sands, especially:
a. A device that spreads sand on roads.
b. Such a device together with the truck that carries it.
c. A machine having a powered abrasive-covered disk or belt, used for smoothing or polishing surfaces: a floor sander.

sander

(ˈsændə)
n
1. (Tools) a power-driven tool for smoothing surfaces, esp wood, plastic, etc, by rubbing with an abrasive disc
2. (Mechanical Engineering) a person who uses such a device

sand•er

(ˈsæn dər)

n.
a person or apparatus that sands.
[1620–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sander - a power tool used for sanding woodsander - a power tool used for sanding wood; an endless loop of sandpaper is moved at high speed by an electric motor
electric motor - a motor that converts electricity to mechanical work
power tool - a tool driven by a motor
Translations

sander

[ˈsændəʳ] N (= tool) (gen) → lijadora f; (for floor) → pulidora f

sander

[ˈsændər] n (= tool) → ponceuse f

sander

n (= tool)Rutscher m, → Vibrationsschleifer m

sander

[ˈsændəʳ] n (machine) → levigatrice f
References in classic literature ?
Well, that was just the way Eliza Jane was taken, and Ellen and Maria Sanders.
Bell had agreed to give him a series of private lessons for $350 a year; and as the child lived with his grandmother in the city of Salem, sixteen miles from Boston, it was agreed that Bell should make his home with the Sanders family.
No one outside of the Sanders family was allowed to enter it, as Bell was nervously afraid of having his ideas stolen.
Often in the middle of the night Bell would wake me up," said Thomas Sanders, the father of Georgie.
Sanders and Hubbard, who had been paying the cost of his experiments, abruptly announced that they would pay no more unless he confined his attention to the musical telegraph, and stopped wasting his time on ear-toys that never could be of any financial value.
Not having enough money to pay the cost of such a journey, he borrowed the price of a return ticket from Sanders and arranged to stay with a friend in Washington, to save a hotel bill that he could not afford.
At nine o'clock, on the morning of June 24, I met President Eliot, the Board of Overseers of Harvard University, and the other guests, at the designated place on the university grounds, for the purpose of being escorted to Sanders Theatre, where the Commencement exercises were to be held and degrees conferred.
Sanders was a big, fat, heavy-faced personage; and the two were the company.
Sanders, who, like the other friend, was bursting with curiosity.
Sanders, who, from certain wistful glances at the little tin saucepan, seemed to be engaged in a mental calculation of the probable extent of the pettitoes, in the event of Sam's being asked to stop to supper.
Sanders volunteered to humour him, so she took a slight sip out of her glass.
Sanders so deeply, that she was under the necessity of refilling and re-emptying her glass immediately; feeling, as she said afterwards, that if she hadn't had the presence of mind to do so, she must have dropped.