sandstone


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sand·stone

 (sănd′stōn′)
n.
A sedimentary rock formed by the consolidation and compaction of sand and held together by a natural cement, such as silica.

sandstone

(ˈsændˌstəʊn)
n
(Geological Science) any of a group of common sedimentary rocks consisting of sand grains consolidated with such materials as quartz, haematite, and clay minerals: used widely in building

sand•stone

(ˈsændˌstoʊn)

n.
a common sedimentary rock consisting of sand, usu. quartz, cemented together by various substances, as silica, calcium carbonate, iron oxide, or clay.
[1660–70]

sand·stone

(sănd′stōn′)
A sedimentary rock formed of fine to coarse sand-sized grains that have been either compacted or cemented together. Although sandstone usually consists primarily of quartz, it can also consist of other minerals. Sandstone varies in color from yellow or red to gray or brown. See Table at rock.

sandstone

A sedimentary rock formed of naturally cemented sand grains.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sandstone - a sedimentary rock consisting of sand consolidated with some cement (clay or quartz etc.)sandstone - a sedimentary rock consisting of sand consolidated with some cement (clay or quartz etc.)
firestone - a sandstone that withstands intense heat; used to line fireplaces and furnaces and kilns
holystone - a soft sandstone used for scrubbing the decks of a ship
arenaceous rock - a sedimentary rock composed of sand
grit, gritrock, gritstone - a hard coarse-grained siliceous sandstone
brownstone - a reddish brown sandstone; used in buildings
bluestone - bluish-grey sandstone used for paving and building
greensand - an olive-green sandstone containing glauconite
siltstone - a fine-grained sandstone of consolidated silt
Translations
حَجَر رَمْليحَجَرٌ رَمْلِيّ
pískovec
sandsten
hiekkakivi
pješčenjak
homokkõ
sandsteinn
砂岩
사암
pieskovec
sandsten
หินทราย
kum taşıkumtaşı
sa thạch

sandstone

[ˈsændstəʊn] Narenisca f

sandstone

[ˈsændstəʊn] ngrès m

sandstone

[ˈsændˌstəʊn] narenaria

sand

(sӕnd) noun
1. a large amount of tiny particles of crushed rocks, shells etc, found on beaches etc.
2. an area of sand, especially on a beach. We lay on the sand.
verb
to smooth with eg sand-paper. The floor should be sanded before you varnish it.
ˈsandy adjective
1. filled or covered with sand. a sandy beach.
2. (of hair) yellowish-red in colour. She has fair skin and sandy hair.
sandbank (ˈsӕnbӕŋk) noun
a bank of sand formed by tides and currents.
sandcastle (ˈsӕnkaːsl) noun
a pile of sand, sometimes made to look like a castle, built especially by children on beaches.
sandpaper (ˈsӕnpeipə) noun
a type of paper with sand glued to it, used for smoothing and polishing.
verb
to make smooth with sandpaper.
sandshoes (ˈsӕnʃuːz) noun plural
soft light shoes, often with rubber soles.
sandstone (ˈsӕnstəun) noun
a soft type of rock made of layers of sand pressed together.
sand-storm (ˈsӕnstoːm) noun
a storm of wind, carrying with it clouds of sand. We were caught in a sandstorm in the desert.

sandstone

حَجَرٌ رَمْلِيّ pískovec sandsten Sandstein ψαμμίτης arenisca hiekkakivi grès pješčenjak arenaria 砂岩 사암 zandsteen sandsten piaskowiec arenito песчаник sandsten หินทราย kumtaşı sa thạch 砂石
References in classic literature ?
He set his teeth and said nothing, but went with the shouting monkeys to a terrace above the red sandstone reservoirs that were half-full of rain water.
Wide prairies Vegetable productions Tabular hills Slabs of sandstone Nebraska or Platte River Scanty fare Buffalo skulls Wagons turned into boats Herds of buffalo Cliffs resembling castles The chimney Scott's Bluffs Story connected with them The bighorn or ahsahta Its nature and habits Difference between that and the "woolly sheep," or goat of the mountains
The Black Hills are chiefly composed of sandstone, and in many places are broken into savage cliffs and precipices, and present the most singular and fantastic forms; sometimes resembling towns and castellated fortresses.
He had always admired the high and mighty old lady, who, in spite of having been only Catherine Spicer of Staten Island, with a father mysteriously discredited, and neither money nor position enough to make people forget it, had allied herself with the head of the wealthy Mingott line, married two of her daughters to "foreigners" (an Italian marquis and an English banker), and put the crowning touch to her audacities by building a large house of pale cream-coloured stone (when brown sandstone seemed as much the only wear as a frock-coat in the afternoon) in an inaccessible wilderness near the Central Park.
They were forced to content themselves with those four stretches of rubble work, backed with sandstone, and a wretched stone gibbet, meagre and bare, on one side.
About twenty miles up the coast from the mouth of the river we encountered low cliffs of sandstone, broken and tortured evidence of the great upheaval which had torn Caprona asunder in the past, intermingling upon a common level the rock formations of widely separated eras, fusing some and leaving others untouched.
Nor would they leave then; but remained to fashion a rude head-stone from a crumbling out-cropping of sandstone and to gather a mass of the gorgeous flowers growing in such great profusion around them and heap the new-made grave with bright blooms.
On the left were the steep red sandstone cliffs, so near the track in places that a mare of less steadiness than the sorrel might have tried the nerves of the people behind her.
Cut deeply in the upright slab of red Island sandstone, the epitaph ran as follows:--
Far down, she saw its entrance between the bar of sand dunes on one side and a steep, high, grim, red sandstone cliff on the other.
And now one of the richest known accumulations of fossil mammals belongs to the middle of the secondary series; and one true mammal has been discovered in the new red sandstone at nearly the commencement of this great series.
The strata are of sandstone, and one layer was remarkable from being composed of a firmly- cemented conglomerate of pumice pebbles, which must have travelled more than four hundred miles, from the Andes.