sank


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sank

 (săngk)
v.
A past tense of sink.

sank

(sæŋk)
vb
the past tense of sink

sink

(sɪŋk)

v. sank, often, sunk; sunk sunk•en; sink•ing; v.i.
1. to fall, drop, or descend gradually to a lower level or position: The ship sank to the bottom of the sea.
2. to settle or fall gradually: The building is sinking.
3. to fall or collapse slowly from weakness, fatigue, etc.: He sank to his knees.
4. to penetrate or permeate; seep.
5. to become engulfed in or gradually enter a state: to sink into slumber.
6. to become deeply absorbed: sunk in thought.
7. to pass or fall into some worse or lower state: to sink into poverty.
8. to decline or deteriorate in quality or worth.
9. to fail in physical strength or health.
10. to become discouraged or depressed: My heart sank.
11. to decrease in amount, extent, intensity, etc.
12. to become lower in volume, tone, or pitch: Her voice sank to a whisper.
13. to slope downward; dip.
14. to disappear from sight, as below the horizon.
15. to become or appear concave or hollow, as the cheeks.
v.t.
16. to cause to become submerged; force into or below the surface.
17. to cause to fall, drop, or descend gradually.
18. to cause to penetrate: to sink an ax into a tree.
19. to lower or depress the level of.
20. to bury or lay in or as if in the ground.
21. to dig, bore, or excavate (a hole, shaft, well, etc.).
22. to bring to a worse or lower state or status.
23. to bring to utter ruin or collapse.
24. to reduce in amount, extent, intensity, etc.
25. to lower in volume or pitch.
26. to suppress; ignore.
27. to invest with the hope of profit or other return: He sank all his energy into the business.
28. to lose (money) in an investment, enterprise, etc.
29. to hit or propel (a ball) so that it goes through or into a basket, hole, pocket, etc.
30. sink in, to enter or permeate the mind; become understood: I repeated it till the words sank in.
n.
31. a basin, usu. connected with a water supply and drainage system, used for washing.
32. a low-lying, poorly drained area where waters collect and sink into the ground or evaporate.
34. a place of vice or corruption.
35. a drain or sewer.
36. a device or place for disposing of energy within a system, as a power-consuming device in an electrical circuit or a condenser in a steam engine.
37. any pond or pit for sewage or waste.
[before 1000; (v.) Middle English; Old English sincan, c. Old Saxon sincan, Old High German sinkan, Old Norse søkkva, Gothic sigqan]
Translations

sink

(siŋk) past tense sank (saŋk) : past participle sunk (saŋk) verb
1. to (cause to) go down below the surface of water etc. The torpedo sank the battleship immediately; The ship sank in deep water.
2. to go down or become lower (slowly). The sun sank slowly behind the hills; Her voice sank to a whisper.
3. to (cause to) go deeply (into something). The ink sank into the paper; He sank his teeth into an apple.
4. (of one's spirits etc) to become depressed or less hopeful. My heart sinks when I think of the difficulties ahead.
5. to invest (money). He sank all his savings in the business.
noun
a kind of basin with a drain and a water supply connected to it. He washed the dishes in the sink.
ˈsunken adjective
1. sunk under water. a sunken ship.
2. below the level of the surrounding area. a sunken garden.
be sunk
to be defeated, in a hopeless position etc. If he finds out that we've been disobeying him, we're sunk.
sink in
1. to be fully understood. The news took a long time to sink in.
2. to be absorbed. The surface water on the paths will soon sink in.
References in classic literature ?
He bent his head, and a third granite mass sank between his shoulders.
Thus glistening for a moment, as slowly it subsided, and sank.
But the tendency to rapid sinking in this substance was in the present instance materially counteracted by the other parts of the head remaining undetached from it, so that it sank very slowly and deliberately indeed, affording Queequeg a fair chance for performing his agile obstetrics on the run, as you may say.
For as mountain after mountain, and island after island, slowly sank beneath the water, fresh bases would be successively afforded for the growth of the corals.
At last he came to a part of the road where the wheels sank half-way into the mire, and the more the horses pulled, the deeper sank the wheels.
Adam saw a medley of green and red lights blaze in a whirling circle, and as it sank down into the well, a pair of blazing green eyes became fixed, sank lower and lower with frightful rapidity, and disappeared, throwing upward the green light which grew more and more vivid every moment.
A burst of flame rose toward the skies with an explosion like that of a hundred cannon; the air burned, ignited by flaming embers, then the frightful lightning disappeared, the brands sank, one after another, into the abyss, where they were extinguished, and save for a slight vibration in the air, after a few minutes had elapsed one would have thought that nothing had happened.
But immediately another wave came, and the head sank back into the water without having said a word.
But, with a final effort, as I sank weakly to my knees I hurled the nine thought waves at that awful thing before me.
These canisters smashed on striking the ground--they did not explode--and incontinently disengaged an enormous volume of heavy, inky vapour, coiling and pour- ing upward in a huge and ebony cumulus cloud, a gaseous hill that sank and spread itself slowly over the surrounding country.
We had been silent a long time, and the edge of the sun sank nearer and nearer the prairie floor, when we saw a figure moving on the edge of the upland, a gun over his shoulder.
When the ship sank I was terribly frightened--because I cannot swim far.