sarcasm


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sar·casm

 (sär′kăz′əm)
n.
1. A cutting, often ironic remark intended to express contempt or ridicule.
2. A form of wit characterized by the use of such remarks: detected a hint of sarcasm in his voice.

[Late Latin sarcasmus, from Greek sarkasmos, from sarkazein, to bite the lips in rage, from sarx, sark-, flesh.]

sarcasm

(ˈsɑːkæzəm)
n
1. mocking, contemptuous, or ironic language intended to convey scorn or insult
2. the use or tone of such language
[C16: from Late Latin sarcasmus, from Greek sarkasmos, from sarkazein to rend the flesh, from sarx flesh]

sar•casm

(ˈsɑr kæz əm)

n.
1. harsh or bitter derision or irony.
2. a sharply ironical taunt; sneering or cutting remark.
[1570–80; < Late Latin sarcasmus < Greek sarkasmós, derivative of sarkázein to rend (flesh), sneer; see sarco-]
syn: See irony1.

sarcasm

Mocking language used to insult someone or something or express contempt.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sarcasm - witty language used to convey insults or scornsarcasm - witty language used to convey insults or scorn; "he used sarcasm to upset his opponent"; "irony is wasted on the stupid"; "Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own"--Jonathan Swift
humor, wit, witticism, wittiness, humour - a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter

sarcasm

sarcasm

noun
Translations

sarcasm

[ˈsɑːkæzəm] Nsarcasmo m

sarcasm

[ˈsɑːrkæzəm] nsarcasme m, raillerie f

sarcasm

nSarkasmus m

sarcasm

[ˈsɑːkæzm] nsarcasmo

sarcasm

(ˈsaːkӕzəm) noun
(the use of) unpleasant remarks intended to hurt a person's feelings.
sarˈcastic (-ˈkӕs-) adjective
containing, or using, sarcasm. a sarcastic person.
sarˈcastically adverb
References in classic literature ?
He never said a clever thing, but he had a vein of brutal sarcasm which was not ineffective, and he always said exactly what he thought.
I read "English Bards and Scotch Reviewers," and I liked its vulgar music and its heavy-handed sarcasm.
Two months after marriage her husband abandoned her, and her impassioned protestations of affection he met with a sarcasm and even hostility that people knowing the count's good heart, and seeing no defects in the sentimental Lidia, were at loss to explain.