sarcasm


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sar·casm

 (sär′kăz′əm)
n.
1. A cutting, often ironic remark intended to express contempt or ridicule.
2. A form of wit characterized by the use of such remarks: detected a hint of sarcasm in his voice.

[Late Latin sarcasmus, from Greek sarkasmos, from sarkazein, to bite the lips in rage, from sarx, sark-, flesh.]

sarcasm

(ˈsɑːkæzəm)
n
1. mocking, contemptuous, or ironic language intended to convey scorn or insult
2. the use or tone of such language
[C16: from Late Latin sarcasmus, from Greek sarkasmos, from sarkazein to rend the flesh, from sarx flesh]

sar•casm

(ˈsɑr kæz əm)

n.
1. harsh or bitter derision or irony.
2. a sharply ironical taunt; sneering or cutting remark.
[1570–80; < Late Latin sarcasmus < Greek sarkasmós, derivative of sarkázein to rend (flesh), sneer; see sarco-]
syn: See irony1.

sarcasm

Mocking language used to insult someone or something or express contempt.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Switch to new thesaurus
Noun1.sarcasm - witty language used to convey insults or scornsarcasm - witty language used to convey insults or scorn; "he used sarcasm to upset his opponent"; "irony is wasted on the stupid"; "Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own"--Jonathan Swift
humor, wit, witticism, wittiness, humour - a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter

sarcasm

sarcasm

noun
Translations

sarcasm

[ˈsɑːkæzəm] Nsarcasmo m

sarcasm

[ˈsɑːrkæzəm] nsarcasme m, raillerie f

sarcasm

nSarkasmus m

sarcasm

[ˈsɑːkæzm] nsarcasmo

sarcasm

(ˈsaːkӕzəm) noun
(the use of) unpleasant remarks intended to hurt a person's feelings.
sarˈcastic (-ˈkӕs-) adjective
containing, or using, sarcasm. a sarcastic person.
sarˈcastically adverb
References in classic literature ?
answered the artist, a strange gleam of half-hidden sarcasm flashing through the kindliness of his manner.
The deed was signed now, he said, with sarcasm proper to the new way of life he had learned--the deed was signed, and so the agent had no longer anything to gain by keeping quiet.
These folks in this canton leave a road to make itself, and then fine you three francs if you 'trot' over it-- as if a horse could trot over such a sarcasm of a road.
I saw in a minute that there was some sarcasm done up in that rag somewheres, but I never let on.
The sarcasm bit, but Wilson kept himself under control, and said without passion:
The sarcasm that had repelled, the harshness that had startled me once, were only like keen condiments in a choice dish: their presence was pungent, but their absence would be felt as comparatively insipid.
said the house-servant, with a parting nod of her head to point the edge of her sarcasm.
At the same time, the thin straight lines of the setting of the eyes, and the thin straight lips, and the markings in the nose, curved with a sarcasm that looked handsomely diabolic.
Steerforth quickly - for there was always some effect of sarcasm in what Rosa Dartle said, though it was said, as this was, in the most unconscious manner in the world - 'in a better school.
No," said the farrier, with bitter sarcasm, looking at the company generally; "and p'rhaps you aren't pig-headed; and p'rhaps you didn't say the cow was a red Durham; and p'rhaps you didn't say she'd got a star on her brow--stick to that, now you're at it.
A gentleman of the "good" century (in distinction from the "grand" century) could alone have invented that compromise between contemptuous silence and a sarcasm which might not have been understood.
repeated his father, in tones of blighting sarcasm, for the expression was not new to him.