sarcophagus

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sar·coph·a·gus

 (sär-kŏf′ə-gəs)
n. pl. sar·coph·a·gi (-jī′) or sar·coph·a·gus·es
A stone coffin, often inscribed or decorated with sculpture.

[Latin, from Greek sarkophagos, coffin, from (lithos) sarkophagos, limestone that consumed the flesh of corpses laid in it : sarx, sark-, flesh + -phagos, -phagous.]
Word History: Sarcophagus, our term for a stone coffin located above ground, has a macabre origin befitting a macabre thing. Its ultimate source is the Greek word sarkophagos, "eating flesh, carnivorous," a compound derived from sarx, "flesh," and phagein, "to eat." Sarkophagos was also used in the phrase lithos ("stone") sarkophagos to denote a kind of limestone with caustic properties from which coffins were made in the ancient world. The Roman natural historian Pliny the Elder says that this stone was quarried near the town of Assos in the Troad and describes its remarkable properties as follows: "It is well known that the bodies of the dead placed in it will be completely consumed after forty days, except for the teeth." The Greek term sarkophagos could also be used by itself as a noun to mean simply "coffin." Greek sarkophagos was borrowed into Latin as sarcophagus and used in the phrase lapis ("stone") sarcophagus to refer to the same stone as in Greek. In Latin, too, sarcophagus came to be used as a noun meaning "coffin made of any material." The first known attestation of the word sarcophagus in English dates from 1601 and occurs in a translation of Pliny's description of the stone. Later, sarcophagus begins to be used in English with the meaning "stone coffin," especially in descriptions of sarcophagi from antiquity.

sarcophagus

(sɑːˈkɒfəɡəs)
n, pl -gi (-ˌɡaɪ) or -guses
a stone or marble coffin or tomb, esp one bearing sculpture or inscriptions
[C17: via Latin from Greek sarkophagos flesh-devouring; from the type of stone used, which was believed to destroy the flesh of corpses]

sar•coph•a•gus

(sɑrˈkɒf ə gəs)

n., pl. -gi (-ˌdʒaɪ, -ˌgaɪ) -gus•es.
a stone coffin, esp. one bearing sculpture, inscriptions, etc., often displayed as a monument.
[1595–1605; < Latin < Greek sarkophágos coffin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sarcophagus - a stone coffin (usually bearing sculpture or inscriptions)sarcophagus - a stone coffin (usually bearing sculpture or inscriptions)
casket, coffin - box in which a corpse is buried or cremated
Translations
sarkofág
sarkofag
sarkofagi
sarkofag
szarkofág
石棺
sarkofag
sarkofag

sarcophagus

[sɑːˈkɒfəgəs] N (sarcophaguses or sarcophagi (pl)) [sɑːˈkɒfəgaɪ]sarcófago m

sarcophagus

[sɑːrˈkɒfəgəs] [sarcophagi] [sɑːrˈkɒfəgaɪ] (pl) nsarcophage m

sarcophagus

n pl <sarcophagi> → Sarkophag m

sarcophagus

[sɑːˈkɒfəgəs] n (sarcophaguses or sarcophagi (pl)) → sarcofago
References in classic literature ?
They fixed their eyes simultaneously on the case opposite them, and when the official figure had vanished down a vista of mummies and sarcophagi Archer spoke again.
The traveller who visits the Vatican, and passes from chamber to chamber through galleries of statues, vases, sarcophagi and candelabra, through all forms of beauty cut in the richest materials, is in danger of forgetting the simplicity of the principles out of which they all sprung, and that they had their origin from thoughts and laws in his own breast.
Khaled al-Anani, the minister of antiquities, said in a statement that eight tombs containing 40 sarcophagi and roughly 1,000 figurines had been unearthed.
Press photo -- Mummy scanning CAIRO -- 3 January 2018: Recently, researchers in London have managed to develop a new scanning technique to reveal hidden writings on papyrus found in ancient Egyptian sarcophagi of mummies.
With excitement, they shared information, adding to the puzzle that would become this lesson: Students would be creating their own colorful Egyptian sarcophagi that were decorated with the patterns and mysterious symbols of the hieroglyphics.
Egypt's antiquities ministry said the unearthed sarcophagi and clay fragments suggest that the area was a large necropolis from sometime between the 27th Dynasty and the Greco-Roman period.
Summary: The archaeologists found "a collection of sarcophagi of different shapes and sizes, as well as clay fragments,"
Perhaps the crowning jewel of this subterranean gallery is a display of 31 sarcophagi depicting human features.
ABSTRACT: In this article we will describe and analyze three marble sarcophagi that were recently unearthed from a hypogeal tomb; rescue excavations were conducted by the Direction-General of Antiquities (Damascus; Tartus) at al-Bayada necropolis, belonging to the ancient city of Amrit, Syria.
The carved motifs depicted on these sarcophagi represent mythological figures, protecting spirits, terrifying figures meant to scare away malevolent ghosts, floral motives, the tree of life, and scenes of daily life including the erotic.
The sarcophagi the police found the mummies in were, however, floating in sewage, and their conditions were so bad that they had disintegrated, according to the report of the ministry.
ySTANBUL (CyHAN)- Five sarcophagi approximated to be about 6,000 years old were uncovered during an excavation at a stone quarry in the western province of Afyonkarahisar's Sandykly district.