sassafras


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Related to sassafras: Sassafras tea, sassafras oil

sas·sa·fras

 (săs′ə-frăs′)
n.
1. A deciduous eastern North American tree (Sassafras albidum) having irregularly lobed leaves and aromatic bark, leaves, and roots.
2. The dried root bark of this plant, used as a source of safrole and formerly as a flavoring.

[Spanish sasafrás, from Late Latin saxifragia, kind of herb, variant of (herba) saxifraga, saxifrage; see saxifrage.]

sassafras

(ˈsæsəˌfræs)
n
1. (Plants) an aromatic deciduous lauraceous tree, Sassafras albidum, of North America, having three-lobed leaves and dark blue fruits
2. (Plants) the aromatic dried root bark of this tree, used as a flavouring, and yielding sassafras oil
3. (Plants) Austral any of several unrelated trees having a similar fragrant bark
[C16: from Spanish sasafrás, of uncertain origin]

sas•sa•fras

(ˈsæs əˌfræs)

n.
1. an E North American tree, Sassafras albidum, having both oval and two- or three-lobed leaves.
2. the aromatic bark of its root, used as a flavoring agent.
[1570–80; < Sp sasafrás]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sassafras - yellowwood tree with brittle wood and aromatic leaves and barksassafras - yellowwood tree with brittle wood and aromatic leaves and bark; source of sassafras oil; widely distributed in eastern North America
sassafras - dried root bark of the sassafras tree
laurel - any of various aromatic trees of the laurel family
genus Sassafras - a genus of sassafras
sassafras oil - oil from root bark of sassafras trees; used in perfumery and as a disinfectant
2.sassafras - dried root bark of the sassafras tree
flavorer, flavoring, flavourer, flavouring, seasoning, seasoner - something added to food primarily for the savor it imparts
sassafras, Sassafras albidum, sassafras tree - yellowwood tree with brittle wood and aromatic leaves and bark; source of sassafras oil; widely distributed in eastern North America
Translations

sassafras

[ˈsæsəfræs] Nsasafrás m

sassafras

nSassafras m

sassafras

n (bot) sasafrás m
References in classic literature ?
There's fresh sassafras boughs for the ladies to sit on, which may not be as proud as their my-hog-guinea chairs, but which sends up a sweeter flavor, than the skin of any hog can do, be it of Guinea, or be it of any other land.
I pray my companion, if he wishes for bread, to ask me for bread, and if he wishes for sassafras or arsenic, to ask me for them, and not to hold out his plate as if I knew already.
In the lower part of the mountain, noble trees of the Winter's Bark, and a laurel like the sassafras with fragrant leaves, and others, the names of which I do not know, were matted together by a trailing bamboo or cane.
HRB is frothy and full-bodied with notes of licorice, sassafras and vanilla.
The Eugene Folklore Society welcomes high-energy dance band Sassafras Stomp and Chicago dance caller Rachel Wallace to its Saturday contra dance.
Hilt, Sassafras, and the Steel Chisel, as well as a short story in the
Kingston Sassafras worth chancing upped in trip with Ed Walker going so well 2.
John Smith, a leader of the Jamestown colony, noted that during the colony's first spring in 1607, English sailors would trade provisions "for money, sassafras, furs, or love.
Sassafras Springs Vineyard in Springdale, owned by Gene Long and his wife, Cheryl, has been open since April 1, but it finally received its wine manufacturing permit from the state in May, though it isn't likely to start producing until the end of the year, Long said.
Arpad and Etti Plesch gave their horses botanical names, including Psidium, Sassafras and Henbit.
His momentum petered out, he hung left, and French champion Sassafras beat him by a head.