sated


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sate 1

 (sāt)
tr.v. sat·ed, sat·ing, sates
1. To satisfy (an appetite) fully.
2. To provide (someone) with more than enough; glut.

[Probably alteration of Middle English saden, from Old English sadian; see sā- in Indo-European roots.]

sate 2

 (sāt, săt)
v. Archaic
A past tense of sit.

sated

(ˈseɪtɪd)
adj
formal fully satisfied
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

sated

adjective satisfied, satiated, slaked, indulged to the full children happily sated with ice cream
Translations
rassassiérepu

sated

[ˈseɪtɪd] adjrepu(e), rassasié(e)
to be sated with sth → être rassasié(e) de qch

sated

[ˈseɪtɪd] adj (frm) → sazio/a
References in classic literature ?
In good time, nevertheless, as the ardor of youth declines; as years and dumps increase; as reflection lends her solemn pauses; in short, as a general lassitude overtakes the sated Turk; then a love of ease and virtue supplants the love for maidens; our Ottoman enters upon the impotent, repentant, admonitory stage of life, forswears, disbands the harem, and grown to an exemplary, sulky old soul, goes about all alone among the meridians and parallels saying his prayers, and warning each young Leviathan from his amorous errors.
For as he lay in bed on the night of the seventh day of his government, sated, not with bread and wine, but with delivering judgments and giving opinions and making laws and proclamations, just as sleep, in spite of hunger, was beginning to close his eyelids, he heard such a noise of bell-ringing and shouting that one would have fancied the whole island was going to the bottom.
Sparta was little better than a wellregulated camp; and Rome was never sated of carnage and conquest.
The baboons gathered about him, sated themselves with blood and battle.
They had already been five and twenty days on the track of the marauders, and were determined not to return home until they had sated their revenge.
I was young; I had good health; pleasure and I had never met; no indulgence of hers had enervated or sated one faculty of my nature.
But when Achilles was now sated with grief and had unburthened the bitterness of his sorrow, he left his seat and raised the old man by the hand, in pity for his white hair and beard; then he said, "Unhappy man, you have indeed been greatly daring; how could you venture to come alone to the ships of the Achaeans, and enter the presence of him who has slain so many of your brave sons?