satirist


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sat·i·rist

 (săt′ər-ĭst)
n.
One who is given to satire, especially a writer of satirical works.

satirist

(ˈsætərɪst)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a person who writes satire
2. a person given to the use of satire

sat•i•rist

(ˈsæt ər ɪst)

n.
1. a writer of satires.
2. a person who indulges in satire.
[1580–90]

satirist

1. a writer of satire.
2. a person who uses satire or makes satirical comments.
See also: Humor
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.satirist - a humorist who uses ridicule and irony and sarcasmsatirist - a humorist who uses ridicule and irony and sarcasm
humorist, humourist - someone who acts speaks or writes in an amusing way
Translations
كاتِب ساخِر إنتِقادي
satirik
satiriker
szatíraíró
satíru-/háîsádeiluhöfundur
satirik
hicivci

satirist

[ˈsætərɪst] N (= writer) → escritor(a) m/f satírico/a; (= cartoonist) → caricaturista mf

satirist

[ˈsætɪrɪst] n
(= writer) → auteur mf satirique
(= cartoonist) → caricaturiste mf

satirist

nSatiriker(in) m(f)

satirist

[ˈsætərɪst] n (writer) → scrittore/trice satirico/a; (cartoonist) → caricaturista m/f

satire

(ˈsӕtaiə) noun
(a piece of) writing etc that makes someone look foolish. a satire on university life.
saˈtirical (-ˈti-) adjective
1. of satire. satirical writing.
2. mocking. in a satirical mood.
ˈsatirist (-ˈti-) noun
a person who writes or performs satire(s).
ˈsatirize, ˈsatirise (-ti-) verb
to make look foolish by using satire.
References in classic literature ?
Paul; and anon, complete his own portrait with one of those touches of pitiless realism which the satirist so often seeks in vain.
But in that bitter tirade upon Chantilly, which appeared in yesterday's'Musée,' the satirist, making some disgraceful allusions to the cobbler s change of name upon assuming the buskin, quoted a Latin line about which we have often conversed.
Now he would take up the position of a practical man and condemn dreamers; now that of a satirist, and laugh ironically at his opponents; now grow severely logical, or suddenly rise to the realm of metaphysics.
How sad that so justly famous a satirist should mar his work by ridicule of people with long noses - who are the salt of the earth
satirist is popularly regarded as a soul-spirited knave, and his ever
He was a sharp satirist, but with more railing and scoffery than became a poet-laureate,"* said one.
Swift, then, is the greatest of English satirists and the only one who as a satirist claims large attention in a brief general survey of English literature.
If his whole life, for instance, should have been one continued subject of satire, he may well tremble when an incensed satirist takes him in hand.
To have painted the sordid facts of their lives, and they throughout invoking the death's head apparition of the family gentility to come and scare their benefactors, would have made Young John a satirist of the first water.
My brother was to be his representative and successor; he must go to Eton and Oxford, for the sake of making connexions, of course: my father was not a man to underrate the bearing of Latin satirists or Greek dramatists on the attainment of an aristocratic position.
In an old book I find columns of notes about works projected at this time, nearly all to consist of essays on deeply uninteresting subjects; the lightest was to be a volume on the older satirists, beginning with Skelton and Tom Nash - the half of that manuscript still lies in a dusty chest - the only story was about Mary Queen of Scots, who was also the subject of many unwritten papers.
Loh is an author, satirist and radio commentator on KCRW-FM (89.