satrapal

satrapal

(ˈsætrəpəl)
adj
relating to a satrap or satrapy
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References in periodicals archive ?
Deniz Kaptan ("From Xenophon to Kristoboulos: Notes on Daskyleion and the Satrapal Court") first compares the site of Daskyleion to its description in Xenophon's works, and then discusses the archaeological evidence for a satrapal court in terms of architecture (for which there is little published information), themes of the memorials (e.
10) In historical terms we know that Artaxerxes carefully protected himself against the growing satrapal power, but Chariton presents the quarrels of the Great King and his rebellious satraps as motivated by Callirhoe, unconsciously the pawn of Aphrodite (Cal.
While this Greek scenario of empire-wide polygyny should not be taken at face value, it may well be representative of the elite of Persian society in the Achaemenid (and later Parthian) period, since Persian nobles, and certainly satraps, imitated polygynous customs of royalty and, as a mirror image of the royal court, they housed numerous concubines within the satrapal palaces.
Alexander then launched a purge of those who could share the blame for failing to get adequate supplies to the army, and a purge of satrapal and army officers whom he could accuse of disloyalty or incompetence.
Alexander's modernization included improvements to the existing form of satrapal government, control and exploitation of the sea (p.
In the only dated Greek document from the period before Ptolemy accepted the royal title, his name and satrapal years are also included next to the regnal year of king Alexander IV (see T.
If Darius ordered the temple to be restored, he may very well have authorized the expenditures from the satrapal revenues.
By 364, internal conflict arose among members of the satrapal family of Dascylium, resulting in the dismemberment of their territory by local freebooters, rebels, and bandits; according to Weiskopf, Greek preoccupation with intrigue and treachery distorted the conflict (pp.