saturnine


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sat·ur·nine

 (săt′ər-nīn′)
adj.
1. Having the temperament of one born under the supposed astrological influence of Saturn.
2.
a. Melancholy or sullen.
b. Having or marked by a tendency to be bitter or sardonic: a saturnine expression on his face.
3. Produced by absorption of lead.

sat′ur·nine′ly adv.

saturnine

(ˈsætəˌnaɪn)
adj
1. having a gloomy temperament; taciturn
2. (Chemistry) archaic
a. of or relating to lead
b. having or symptomatic of lead poisoning
[C15: from French saturnin, from Medieval Latin sāturnīnus (unattested), from Latin Sāturnus Saturn, with reference to the gloomy influence attributed to the planet Saturn]
ˈsaturˌninely adv
saturninity n

sat•ur•nine

(ˈsæt ərˌnaɪn)

adj.
1. sluggish or gloomy in temperament or appearance; somber; taciturn.
2. suffering from lead poisoning.
3. due to absorption of lead, as bodily disorders.
sat′ur•nine`ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.saturnine - bitter or scornful; "the face was saturnine and swarthy, and the sensual lips...twisted with disdain"- Oscar Wilde
sarcastic - expressing or expressive of ridicule that wounds
2.saturnine - showing a brooding ill humor; "a dark scowl"; "the proverbially dour New England Puritan"; "a glum, hopeless shrug"; "he sat in moody silence"; "a morose and unsociable manner"; "a saturnine, almost misanthropic young genius"- Bruce Bliven; "a sour temper"; "a sullen crowd"
ill-natured - having an irritable and unpleasant disposition

saturnine

adjective gloomy, grave, sombre, dour, morose, glum, taciturn, phlegmatic, uncommunicative He is a saturnine man who speaks with precision and pedantic care.

saturnine

adjective
Broodingly and sullenly unhappy:
Translations

saturnine

[ˈsætənaɪn] ADJsaturnino

saturnine

[ˈsætərnaɪn] adj [looks, manner] → sévère

saturnine

adj (liter)finster, düster

saturnine

[ˈsætəˌnaɪn] adj (liter) → malinconico/a, taciturno/a
References in classic literature ?
Our readers will probably be divided in their opinions concerning this action; some may applaud it perhaps as an act of extraordinary humanity, while those of a more saturnine temper will consider it as a want of regard to that justice which every man owes his country.
He does promise one," replied Samson; "but he says he has not found it, nor does he know who has got it; and we cannot say whether it will appear or not; and so, on that head, as some say that no second part has ever been good, and others that enough has been already written about Don Quixote, it is thought there will be no second part; though some, who are jovial rather than saturnine, say, 'Let us have more Quixotades, let Don Quixote charge and Sancho chatter, and no matter what it may turn out, we shall be satisfied with that.
He twisted his heavy mouth into a faint smile--he was one of those saturnine people who smile with the corners of the mouth down,-- and bowed his acknowledgment of my complaisance.
Since he had heard of Lilla's death, the gloom of his remorse, emphasised by Mimi's upbraiding, had made more hopeless his cruel, selfish, saturnine nature.
Surely it was an evil omen, this man's coming; for it was Captain Francis who had taken the vacant seat and who was watching his astonishment with a somewhat saturnine smile.
The two cousins were elderly men from Brassing, one of them conscious of claims on the score of inconvenient expense sustained by him in presents of oysters and other eatables to his rich cousin Peter; the other entirely saturnine, leaning his hands and chin on a stick, and conscious of claims based on no narrow performance but on merit generally: both blameless citizens of Brassing, who wished that Jonah Featherstone did not live there.
Heathcliff, grim and saturnine, on the one hand, and Hareton, absolutely dumb, on the other, I made a somewhat cheerless meal, and bade adieu early.
Somebody strike a light, my thumb's out of joint," said one of the men, Parsons, a swarthy, saturnine man, boat-steerer in Standish's boat, in which Harrison was puller.
He, who had been so merry-hearted, even merrier-hearted than his brother Jerry, began to grow saturnine, and peevish, and ill-tempered.
The Artful, meantime, who was of a rather saturnine disposition, and seldom gave way to merriment when it interfered with business, rifled Oliver's pockets with steady assiduity.
Somehow his words and his look did not seem to accord, or else it was that his cast of face made his smile look malignant and saturnine.
His lank limbs were clad, I might also say clutched, in very tight grey sleeves and pantaloons; he had a long, sallow, aquiline face which seemed somehow all the more saturnine because his lantern jaws were imprisoned in his collar and neck-cloth more in the style of the old stock; and his hair (which ought to have been dark brown) was of an odd dim, russet colour which, in conjunction with his yellow face, looked rather purple than red.