satyric


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sa·tyr

 (sā′tər, săt′ər)
n.
1. often Satyr Greek Mythology A woodland creature depicted as having the pointed ears, legs, and short horns of a goat and a fondness for unrestrained revelry.
2. A licentious man; a lecher.
3. A man who is affected by satyriasis.
4. Any of various satyrid butterflies having brownish wings marked with eyespots.

[Middle English satire, from Old French, from Latin satyrus, from Greek saturos.]

sa·tyr′ic (sā-tîr′ĭk, sə-), sa·tyr′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.satyric - of or relating to or having the characteristics of a satyr; "this satyric old man pursues young girls"
References in classic literature ?
Moreover, it was not till late that the short plot was discarded for one of greater compass, and the grotesque diction of the earlier satyric form for the stately manner of Tragedy.
By contrast, Sheffield (2006, 194) interprets the theme of seduction within the context of Socrates' hubris, but for the purpose of arguing that "The seriocomic manner in which Alcibiades explores the virtues of the philosopher is characteristic of the way in which satyric dramas explored serious themes in a different, humorous, spirit.
This response would have humored Swift as a modern-day validation of his will's famous bequest; and that last turn of the Swiftian screw is immortalized in the very elegy Swift wrote (1731) on his own death: He gave the little Wealth he had, / To build a House for Fools and Mad:/ And shew'd by one satyric Touch, / No Nation wanted it so much.
He uses a combination of melody and movement or body language (lines 793, 803) and the song contains a fantastic narrative (Perseus' envisaged future in the Satyric family).
Satyros' name gives some of his game away, but rather than indulging his own satyric appetites, his role is restricted to encouraging and facilitating those of his master.
Generic volatility in Titus becomes the dramatic means through which the playwright foregrounds spatial reformation, as the action moves quickly from Rome's epic geography of sacred space to Tamora and Aaron's bloody revenge situated in a landscape that is its spatial opposite--a change that was perhaps made visually conspicuous through the turn from tragic to satyric scenery.
Winterson repeats his tale of devious cunning that used to make "a fine subject for satyric treatment" (Sutton 1980, 87).
I suppose you could say "Cambridge" enhanced a certain lyric, elegaic, and satyric poetic disposition already encompassed in my hippocamp.
I believe, upon the whole there were 200 Women and yet none of those disdainfull smiles or satyric whispers that never fail in our assemblys when any body appears that is not dress'd exactly in fashion.
Modern editors, by calling every satyric inconsistency a "notoria equivocacion," "lapsus o error," "descuido de Cervantes," "claro error," simply poison the minds of readers.
The point of the crude pun is exactly to create a grossly satyric effect.