saunterer


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saun·ter

 (sôn′tər)
intr.v. saun·tered, saun·ter·ing, saun·ters
To walk at a leisurely pace; stroll.
n.
1. A leisurely pace.
2. A leisurely walk or stroll.

[Probably from Middle English santren, to muse.]

saun′ter·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.saunterer - someone who walks at a leisurely pacesaunterer - someone who walks at a leisurely pace
pedestrian, footer, walker - a person who travels by foot
Translations

saunterer

nBummler(in) m(f) (inf)
References in classic literature ?
I have met with but one or two persons in the course of my life who understood the art of Walking, that is, of taking walks--who had a genius, so to speak, for SAUNTERING, which word is beautifully derived "from idle people who roved about the country, in the Middle Ages, and asked charity, under pretense of going a la Sainte Terre," to the Holy Land, till the children exclaimed, "There goes a Sainte-Terrer," a Saunterer, a Holy-Lander.
His satisfaction communicates itself to a third saunterer through the long vacation in Kenge and Carboy's office, to wit, Young Smallweed.
Saunterers pricked up their attention to observe it; busy people, crossing it, slackened their pace and turned their heads; companions pausing and standing aside, whispered one another to look at this spectral woman who was coming by; and the sweep of the figure as it passed seemed to create a vortex, drawing the most idle and most curious after it.
Sophia Thoreau-"Cara Sophia" The Concord Saunterer.
A flaneur is, shortly speaking, a saunterer who slowly (the pace plays an important role here) strolls the city streets with no purpose, making insightful observations of the urban space and turning them into art--an art of designing and aesthetizing the encountered individuals, situations, eavesdropped conversations and views recorded in the flaneur's memory.
El academicismo, naturalmente, cierra el paso al saunterer Thoreau mas alla de Los sentidos de Walden de Cavell.
The play of vision is reciprocal between the saunterer on the road and other people who occupy a succession of "glades" and "yards.