saw log


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saw log

n.
A log of a size large enough to be sawed into boards.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.saw log - log large enough to be sawed into boardssaw log - log large enough to be sawed into boards
log - a segment of the trunk of a tree when stripped of branches
References in classic literature ?
But a real horse is alive, and trots and prances and eats oats, while this is nothing more than a dead horse, made of wood, and used to saw logs upon.
It had been rudely made, in the beginning, to saw logs upon, so that its body was a short length of a log, and its legs were stout branches fitted into four holes made in the body.
Some suggestions for future research on optimum bucking application shall include: implementing optimum bucking method not only saw log production but also other wood based products (i.
were about 13 percent lower than 2014, and panel prices were down about 3 percent, delivered saw log prices in Montana were down only slightly.
shortwood) production systems; those associated with saw mills concerned themselves with existing saw log (i.
A forest geneticist working for a wood-products company might focus on genetic improvements to change the length of tree cells used for making paper or the volume of wood in a saw log.
After 14 years of custom work, he saw log homes as a means of differentiating Pierce & Associates Design/Build from its Minneapolis competitors.
Saw log costs were lower in the quarter due to lower log prices and log mix, compared to the third quarter of 2008.
Trees that would yield 20 and even 30 feet of clear saw log were not uncommon.
Pulp operations don't stand alone in the industry; they need saw log operations harvesting trees to make chip logs available.
In addition, the Company has announced a reduction in planned timber harvest, primarily in Idaho, amounting to 500,000 tons or 18 percent of planned 2009 saw log harvest.
Examining volume production, both softwood and hardwood saw log production increased gradually until the mid 1990s, followed by a period of relative stability prior to decreasing in 2007 and 2009 (Figure 4).