scalding

(redirected from scaldingly)
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scald·ing

 (skôl′dĭng)
adj.
1. Hot enough to scald the skin: scalding water.
2. Causing a burning sensation like that of hot liquid on the skin: scalding tears.
3.
a. Emotionally painful or traumatic: a scalding experience.
b. Harshly critical or denunciatory; scathing: a scalding review of the play.

scald′ing·ly adv.

scalding

(ˈskɔːldɪŋ)
adj
that scalds; too hot; burning
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

scalding

adjective burning, boiling, searing, blistering, piping hot scalding hot water

scalding

adjective
Translations
ساخِن، غالٍ
horký
brennandi
haşlayacak kadar sıcak

scalding

[ˈskɔːldɪŋ] ADJ it's scalding (hot)está hirviendo or (LAm) que arde
the soup is scaldingla sopa está muy caliente

scalding

[ˈskɔːldɪŋ] adj (also scalding hot) → brûlant(e), bouillant(e)

scalding

adjsiedend; (inf: = very hot) → siedend heiß; (fig) tearsheiß
adv scalding hotsiedend heiß; skin, weatherglühend heiß

scalding

[ˈskɔːldɪŋ] adj scalding hotbollente

scald

(skoːld) verb
1. to hurt with hot liquid or steam. He scalded his hand with boiling water.
2. in cooking, to heat (eg milk) to just below boiling-point.
noun
a hurt caused by hot liquid or steam.
ˈscalding adjective
(of a liquid) hot enough to scald.
References in classic literature ?
In another moment a huge wave, like a muddy tidal bore but almost scaldingly hot, came sweeping round the bend upstream.
of Hemingway that clearly defines For Whom as a model for The Cry, as is clear in the following two descriptions of sexual intercourse (the first from Hemingway and the second from Bulosan): "For him it was a dark passage which led to nowhere, then to nowhere, then again to nowhere, once again to nowhere, always and forever to nowhere, heavy on the elbows in the earth to nowhere, dark and never any end to nowhere, hung on all time always to unknowing nowhere, this time and again for always to nowhere, now not to be borne once again always and to nowhere, now beyond all bearing up, up, up and into nowhere, suddenly, scaldingly, holdingly all nowhere gone and time absolutely still and they were both there, time having stopped and he felt the earth move out and away from under them" (159).
There is no record of Gilbert Sorrentino, a Bay Ridge native who wrote about its indigenes with unsurpassable intimacy, ever having delivered an opinion about Saturday Night Fever, which is a shame, because I can easily imagine how scaldingly funny he would have been about its cluelessness on class, its ethnic prejudices and Manhattan-centric snobbery, and its shaky grasp of human particulars.