scamp


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Related to scamp: casita

scamp 1

 (skămp)
n.
1. A rogue; a rascal.
2. A mischievous youngster.

[Probably from scamp, to go about idly, probably from obsolete Dutch schampen, to decamp, from Middle Dutch ontscampen; see scamper.]

scamp 2

 (skămp)
tr.v. scamped, scamp·ing, scamps
To perform or make in a careless or inadequate way.

[Possibly of Scandinavian origin.]

scamp′er n.

scamp

(skæmp)
n
1. an idle mischievous person; rascal
2. a mischievous child
[C18: from scamp (vb) to be a highway robber, probably from Middle Dutch schampen to decamp, from Old French escamper, from es- ex-1 + -camper, from Latin campus field]
ˈscampish adj

scamp

(skæmp)
vb
a less common word for skimp
ˈscamper n

scamp

(skæmp)

n.
1. an unscrupulous person; rascal.
2. a playful or mischievous young person.
v.t.
3. to do in a hasty, careless manner: to scamp work.
[1775–85; obsolete scamp to travel about idly or for mischief, perhaps < Dutch (now obsolete) schampen to be gone < Old French escamper to decamp]
scamp′ish, adj.

scamp

- Once meant a highwayman; as a verb, it meant "rob on the highway."
See also related terms for highway.

scamp


Past participle: scamped
Gerund: scamping

Imperative
scamp
scamp
Present
I scamp
you scamp
he/she/it scamps
we scamp
you scamp
they scamp
Preterite
I scamped
you scamped
he/she/it scamped
we scamped
you scamped
they scamped
Present Continuous
I am scamping
you are scamping
he/she/it is scamping
we are scamping
you are scamping
they are scamping
Present Perfect
I have scamped
you have scamped
he/she/it has scamped
we have scamped
you have scamped
they have scamped
Past Continuous
I was scamping
you were scamping
he/she/it was scamping
we were scamping
you were scamping
they were scamping
Past Perfect
I had scamped
you had scamped
he/she/it had scamped
we had scamped
you had scamped
they had scamped
Future
I will scamp
you will scamp
he/she/it will scamp
we will scamp
you will scamp
they will scamp
Future Perfect
I will have scamped
you will have scamped
he/she/it will have scamped
we will have scamped
you will have scamped
they will have scamped
Future Continuous
I will be scamping
you will be scamping
he/she/it will be scamping
we will be scamping
you will be scamping
they will be scamping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been scamping
you have been scamping
he/she/it has been scamping
we have been scamping
you have been scamping
they have been scamping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been scamping
you will have been scamping
he/she/it will have been scamping
we will have been scamping
you will have been scamping
they will have been scamping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been scamping
you had been scamping
he/she/it had been scamping
we had been scamping
you had been scamping
they had been scamping
Conditional
I would scamp
you would scamp
he/she/it would scamp
we would scamp
you would scamp
they would scamp
Past Conditional
I would have scamped
you would have scamped
he/she/it would have scamped
we would have scamped
you would have scamped
they would have scamped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scamp - one who is playfully mischievousscamp - one who is playfully mischievous  
child, kid, minor, nipper, tiddler, youngster, tike, shaver, small fry, nestling, fry, tyke - a young person of either sex; "she writes books for children"; "they're just kids"; "`tiddler' is a British term for youngster"
brat, holy terror, little terror, terror - a very troublesome child
Verb1.scamp - perform hastily and carelessly
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
perform, do, execute - carry out or perform an action; "John did the painting, the weeding, and he cleaned out the gutters"; "the skater executed a triple pirouette"; "she did a little dance"

scamp

noun rascal, devil, monkey, rogue, imp, tyke (informal), wretch, knave (archaic), scallywag (informal), pickle (Brit. informal), mischief-maker, whippersnapper, toerag (slang), scapegrace Have some respect for me, you scamp!

scamp

noun
One who causes minor trouble or damage:
Informal: cutup.
Translations

scamp

2 [skæmp] VT [+ one's work etc] → chapucear, frangollar

scamp

[ˈskæmp] n (= rascal) → voyou m

scamp

1
n (inf)Frechdachs m, → Lausebengel m (inf)

scamp

2
vt workpfuschen or schludern (inf)bei

scamp

1 [skæmp] n (fam) (child) → peste f

scamp

2 vt (one's work) → fare in fretta e male
References in classic literature ?
Even Negrillon, who pretended to have burnt his leg that he might rest from work--he only laughed, and said Negrillon was a great scamp.
Then tell me; art thou not an arrant, all-grasping, inter-meddling, monopolizing, heathenish old scamp, to be one day making legs, and the next day coffins to clap them in, and yet again life-buoys out of those same coffins?
said George; "look here--I told Aunt Chloe I'd do it, and she advised me just to make a hole in it, and put a string through, so you could hang it round your neck, and keep it out of sight; else this mean scamp would take it away.
Oh, you bewitching little scamp, CAN'T you be quiet just a minute or two, and let your poor old uncle attend to a part of his duties?
To think, here I've been, night after night, a -- YOU just get well once, you young scamp, and I lay I'll tan the Old Harry out o' both o' ye
A perfect, all-rounded man is so rare that Socrates, one of the noblest pearls of humanity, declared (as a phrenologist of that day) that he was born to be a scamp, and a very bad one.
After this, forcing a laugh, I said, "And now, you scamp, you wanted to make me believe that a Square may in the same way by motion 'Upward, not Northward' produce another figure, a sort of extra Square in Three Dimensions.
Mithridates rex Ponticus," said the young scamp, as he tore some beautiful portraits out of a splendid album, "the individual who took cream in his cup of poison every morning at breakfast.
It wouldn't do, and I had to pay the scamp a hundred.
In reply he termed me "a dry-hearted aristocratic scamp," whereupon I again charged him with having taken the bread out of my mouth.
Appearances are everything, so far as human opinion goes, and the man who will walk down Piccadilly arm in arm with the most notorious scamp in London, provided he is a well-dressed one, will slink up a back street to say a couple of words to a seedy-looking gentleman.
I have even a shrewd suspicion that what with showing the balloon, explaining the plans and views of the doctor, giving folks a glimpse of the latter, through a half-opened window, or pointing him out as he passed along the streets, the clever scamp earned a few half-crowns, but we must not find fault with him for that.