scamper


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scam·per

 (skăm′pər)
intr.v. scam·pered, scam·per·ing, scam·pers
To run or go quickly and lightly: children scampering off to play.
n.
A quick light run or movement.

[Probably from Flemish schampeeren, frequentative of obsolete Dutch schampen, to run away, decamp, from Middle Dutch ontscampen, from Old French escamper, from Old Italian scampare, from Vulgar Latin *excampāre, from Latin ex campō, out of the field : ex, away; see ex- + campō, ablative of campus, field.]

scamper

(ˈskæmpə)
vb (intr)
1. to run about playfully
2. (often foll by through) to hurry quickly through (a place, task, book, etc)
n
the act of scampering
[C17: probably from scamp (vb); see scamp1]
ˈscamperer n

scamp•er

(ˈskæm pər)

v.i.
1. to run or go hastily.
2. to run playfully about; caper.
n.
3. an act or instance of scampering.
[1680–90; obsolete scamp (see scamp) + -er6]

scamper


Past participle: scampered
Gerund: scampering

Imperative
scamper
scamper
Present
I scamper
you scamper
he/she/it scampers
we scamper
you scamper
they scamper
Preterite
I scampered
you scampered
he/she/it scampered
we scampered
you scampered
they scampered
Present Continuous
I am scampering
you are scampering
he/she/it is scampering
we are scampering
you are scampering
they are scampering
Present Perfect
I have scampered
you have scampered
he/she/it has scampered
we have scampered
you have scampered
they have scampered
Past Continuous
I was scampering
you were scampering
he/she/it was scampering
we were scampering
you were scampering
they were scampering
Past Perfect
I had scampered
you had scampered
he/she/it had scampered
we had scampered
you had scampered
they had scampered
Future
I will scamper
you will scamper
he/she/it will scamper
we will scamper
you will scamper
they will scamper
Future Perfect
I will have scampered
you will have scampered
he/she/it will have scampered
we will have scampered
you will have scampered
they will have scampered
Future Continuous
I will be scampering
you will be scampering
he/she/it will be scampering
we will be scampering
you will be scampering
they will be scampering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been scampering
you have been scampering
he/she/it has been scampering
we have been scampering
you have been scampering
they have been scampering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been scampering
you will have been scampering
he/she/it will have been scampering
we will have been scampering
you will have been scampering
they will have been scampering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been scampering
you had been scampering
he/she/it had been scampering
we had been scampering
you had been scampering
they had been scampering
Conditional
I would scamper
you would scamper
he/she/it would scamper
we would scamper
you would scamper
they would scamper
Past Conditional
I would have scampered
you would have scampered
he/she/it would have scampered
we would have scampered
you would have scampered
they would have scampered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scamper - rushing about hastily in an undignified wayscamper - rushing about hastily in an undignified way
rush, rushing, haste, hurry - the act of moving hurriedly and in a careless manner; "in his haste to leave he forgot his book"
Verb1.scamper - to move about or proceed hurriedly; "so terrified by the extraordinary ebbing of the sea that they scurried to higher ground"
crab - scurry sideways like a crab
run - move fast by using one's feet, with one foot off the ground at any given time; "Don't run--you'll be out of breath"; "The children ran to the store"

scamper

verb run, dash, dart, fly, hurry, sprint, romp, beetle, hasten, scuttle, scurry, scoot, hie (archaic) The flash sent the foxes scampering away.

scamper

verb
To move swiftly on foot so that both feet leave the ground during each stride:
Translations
يَنْطَلِق مُسْرِعاً
pelášit
pile
iramodik
skjótast, òjóta
laisties lapāsmukt
seğirtmek

scamper

[ˈskæmpəʳ] VIescabullirse
to scamper in/outentrar/salir corriendo
to scamper alongir corriendo
scamper about VI + ADVcorretear
scamper away scamper off VI + ADVescabullirse

scamper

[ˈskæmpər] vi
to scamper away → détaler

scamper

n they can go for a scamper in the gardensie können im Garten herumtollen
vi (person, child, puppy)tollen; (rabbit)hoppeln; (squirrel, mice)huschen

scamper

[ˈskæmpəʳ] vi + adv (child) to scamper aboutscorrazzare
to scamper in/out → entrare/uscire di corsa
to scamper away, scamper off → darsela a gambe

scamper

(ˈskӕmpə) verb
to run quickly and lightly. The mouse scampered away when it saw me.
References in classic literature ?
Children, too young to comprehend wherefore this woman should be shut out from the sphere of human charities, would creep nigh enough to behold her plying her needle at the cottage-window, or standing in the doorway, or labouring in her little garden, or coming forth along the pathway that led townward, and, discerning the scarlet letter on her breast, would scamper off with a strange contagious fear.
At two o'clock Sam and Andy brought the horses up to the posts, apparently greatly refreshed and invigorated by the scamper of the morning.
Bundles of candles were procured, and straightway there was a general scamper up the hill.
I reached this book, and a pot of ink from a shelf, and pushed the house-door ajar to give me light, and I have got the time on with writing for twenty minutes; but my companion is impatient, and proposes that we should appropriate the dairywoman's cloak, and have a scamper on the moors, under its shelter.
To save yourselves, to scamper away, to flee--that is good for the king's Musketeers
their mother would say; and they would scamper off.
To everyone I would run with a greeting, and laugh, and giggle, and scamper about, and skip for very joy.
These skulking visitors would keep about the purlieus of the camp until daylight; when, on the first stir of life among the sleepers, they would scamper off until they reached some rising ground, where they would take their seats, and keep a sharp and hungry watch upon every movement.
The tribe consists of four bands, which have their nestling- places in fertile, well-wooded valleys, lying among the Rocky Mountains, and watered by the Big Horse River and its tributary streams; but, though these are properly their homes, where they shelter their old people, their wives, and their children, the men of the tribe are almost continually on the foray and the scamper.