scarecrow


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scare·crow

 (skâr′krō′)
n.
1. A crude image or effigy of a person set up in a field to scare birds away from growing crops.
2. Something frightening but not dangerous.
3. A gaunt or haggard person.

scarecrow

(ˈskɛəˌkrəʊ)
n
1. an object, usually in the shape of a man, made out of sticks and old clothes to scare birds away from crops
2. a person or thing that appears frightening but is not actually harmful
3. informal
a. an untidy-looking person
b. a very thin person

scare•crow

(ˈskɛərˌkroʊ)

n.
1. an object, usu. a figure of a person in old clothes, set up to frighten crows or other birds away from crops.
2. something frightening but not dangerous.
3. a ragged or extremely thin person.
[1545–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scarecrow - an effigy in the shape of a man to frighten birds away from seedsscarecrow - an effigy in the shape of a man to frighten birds away from seeds
effigy, simulacrum, image - a representation of a person (especially in the form of sculpture); "the coin bears an effigy of Lincoln"; "the emperor's tomb had his image carved in stone"

scarecrow

noun
A person wearing ragged or tattered clothing:
Translations
فَزَّاعَةفَزّاعَه
strašákstrašák do zelí
fugleskræmsel
linnunpelätinvariksenpelätinvariksenpelätti
strašilo
madárijesztő
fuglahræîa
かかし
허수아비
strašilo
strašilo
fågelskrämma
หุ่นไล่กา
bostan korkuluğukorkuluk
bù nhìn

scarecrow

[ˈskɛəkrəʊ] Nespantapájaros m inv, espantajo m

scarecrow

[ˈskɛərkrəʊ] n (to frighten birds)épouvantail m

scarecrow

[ˈskɛəkrəʊ] n (also, fig) → spaventapasseri m inv

scare

(skeə) verb
to startle or frighten. You'll scare the baby if you shout; His warning scared her into obeying him.
noun
1. a feeling of fear or alarm. The noise gave me a scare.
2. a feeling of fear or panic among a large number of people. a smallpox scare.
scared adjective
frightened. I'm scared of spiders; a scared little girl.
ˈscarecrow noun
a figure set up eg in a field, to scare away birds and stop them eating the seeds etc.
ˈscaremonger noun
a person who spreads alarming rumours.
scare away/off
to make go away or stay away because of fear. The birds were scared away by the dog.

scarecrow

فَزَّاعَة strašák do zelí fugleskræmsel Vogelscheuche σκιάχτρο espantapájaros linnunpelätin épouvantail strašilo spaventapasseri かかし 허수아비 vogelverschrikker fugleskremsel strach na wróble espantalho пугало fågelskrämma หุ่นไล่กา korkuluk bù nhìn 草人
References in classic literature ?
To see him striding along the profile of a hill on a windy day, with his clothes bagging and fluttering about him, one might have mistaken him for the genius of famine descending upon the earth, or some scarecrow eloped from a cornfield.
I was the pride of the mountains and the Great Plains; now I am a scarecrow and despised.
said Alice, peering nervously under the cover, "and he looks like a scarecrow.
To this crib I always took my doll; human beings must love something, and, in the dearth of worthier objects of affection, I contrived to find a pleasure in loving and cherishing a faded graven image, shabby as a miniature scarecrow.
We went the nearest way, without conversing much upon the road; and he was so humble in respect of those scarecrow gloves, that he was still putting them on, and seemed to have made no advance in that labour, when we got to my place.
In his working clothes, Joe was a well-knit characteristic-looking blacksmith; in his holiday clothes, he was more like a scarecrow in good circumstances, than anything else.
I followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all, with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting, far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
Peter's coat and shoes were plainly to be seen upon the scarecrow, topped with an old tam-o- shanter of Mr.
The prodigious scarecrow obeyed, and standing up, removed the veil from his face and disclosed the most enormous, the longest, the whitest and the thickest beard that human eyes had ever beheld until that moment, and then fetching up a grave, sonorous voice from the depths of his broad, capacious chest, and fixing his eyes on the duke, he said:
To the absolute governments, with their following of parsons, professors, country squires and officials, it served as a welcome scarecrow against the threatening bourgeoisie.
His voice had directed the attention of the whole town to Peter Goldthwaite's window, and to the dusty scarecrow which appeared at it.
She was determined, therefore, to contrive as lifelike a scarecrow as ever was seen, and to finish it immediately, from top to toe, so that it should begin its sentinel's duty that very morning.