scenographic

sce·nog·ra·phy

 (sē-nŏg′rə-fē)
n.
1. The art of representing objects in perspective, especially as applied in the design and painting of theatrical scenery.
2. Visual design for theatrical productions, including such elements as sets, costumes, and lighting.

sce·nog′raph·er n.
sce′no·graph′ic (sē′nə-grăf′ĭk) adj.
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References in periodicals archive ?
through this market, the department of ain intends to carry out the reopening of an old semi-industrial workshop in a scenographic space to allow visitors to discover the history of the place, machines and buildings as well as the materials and objects which were manufactured on site, the operation of paddle wheels and the use of water.
Italian culture was at the heart of the event, including orchestral performances, a scenographic light show and the dance music of famous Italian DJ Mokai.
This new research seeks to question the manipulation of space as a mere geometric exercise, but also the increased prevalence--in the age of photography, Instagram, and computer modeling--of scenographic conceptions of architecture.
In the hands of the precociously brilliant sculptor Pierre Le Gros the Younger, and the imaginative painter, architect and scenographic designer Andrea Pozzo, their stories, too, become improbably thrilling.
It was written and directed by Haifaa Al-Sanoussi, a professor of Literature at Kuwait University, and scenographic engineer Razan Al-Awda, as well as acted by Mohammad Akryamas, Taha Al-Zein and Ayoub Al-Masri.
In sections on technical space, architectural space, agency, audiences, and materials, they consider such topics as scenographic screen space: bearing witness and performing resistance, between symbolic representation and new critical realism: architecture as scenography and scenography as architecture, scenography matters: performing Romani identities, thinking that matters: towards a post-anthropocentric approach to performance design, and the matter of water: bodily experience of scenography in contemporary spectacle.
All told, Blatrix's scenographic exhibition similarly placed the viewer in the frustrating position of trying to decipher an illegible code.
Thus, the selection of drawing materials is a crucial springboard for Howard's scenographic journey.
Chapter 1 provides a cogent history of French Caribbean theater from colonial times to the present, and felicitously marries together sociopolitical context, cultural history, and aesthetic and scenographic examination--a methodology that is repeated throughout the study.
The Irish Masque is quite stark in the requirements for its staging compared with many of its predecessors: there is no scenographic coup, and the climactic transformation here is a matter of changing attitude and effected as a willed choice on the part of the characters involved.
The recreation of an ideal city in the classic commedia erudita--its scenographic symbols of power representing reimposition of order at the conclusion of comic mayhem--is replaced by a vertiginous no-place that is immediately recognizable to both the players and the public (Baratto, La commedia 39-45).
The central argument is that the body in its painted form is a key focus for the audience, often replacing other scenographic effects.