sceptic


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scep·tic

 (skĕp′tĭk)
n.
Variant of skeptic.

scep′ti·cal adj.

sceptic

(ˈskɛptɪk) or

skeptic

n
1. (Philosophy) a person who habitually doubts the authenticity of accepted beliefs
2. a person who mistrusts people, ideas, etc, in general
3. (Philosophy) a person who doubts the truth of religion, esp Christianity
adj
(Philosophy) of or relating to sceptics; sceptical
[C16: from Latin scepticus, from Greek skeptikos one who reflects upon, from skeptesthai to consider]
ˈscepticism, ˈskepticism n

Sceptic

(ˈskɛptɪk) or

Skeptic

n
(Philosophy) a member of one of the ancient Greek schools of philosophy, esp that of Pyrrho, who believed that real knowledge of things is impossible
adj
of or relating to the Sceptics
ˈScepticism, ˈSkepticism n

skep•tic

or scep•tic

(ˈskɛp tɪk)

n.
1. a person who questions the validity, authenticity, or truth of something purporting to be factual, esp. religion or religious tenets.
2. a person who maintains a doubting attitude, as toward values, plans, or the character of others.
3. (cap.)
a. a member of a philosophical school of ancient Greece which maintained that real knowledge of things is impossible.
b. any later thinker who doubts or questions the possibility of real knowledge of any kind.
adj.
5. (cap.) pertaining to the Skeptics.
[1565–75; < Late Latin scepticus thoughtful, inquiring (in pl. Scepticī the Skeptics) < Greek skeptikós, derivative of -skept(os), v. adj. of sképtesthai to consider, examine]

sceptic

sceptical
1. 'sceptic'

Sceptic is a noun. A sceptic is someone who has doubts about things that other people believe.

The sceptic may argue that there are no grounds for such optimism.
He will need to polish his arguments if he is to convince the sceptics.
2. 'sceptical'

Sceptical is an adjective. If you are sceptical about something, you have doubts about it.

Robert's father was sceptical about hypnotism.
At first Meyer had been sceptical.

The usual American spellings of 'sceptic' and 'sceptical' are skeptic and skeptical.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sceptic - someone who habitually doubts accepted beliefssceptic - someone who habitually doubts accepted beliefs
intellectual, intellect - a person who uses the mind creatively
doubting Thomas - someone who demands physical evidence in order to be convinced (especially when this demand is out of place)
pessimist - a person who expects the worst

sceptic

noun
1. doubter, cynic, scoffer, questioner, disbeliever, Pyrrhonist He was a born sceptic.
2. agnostic, doubter, unbeliever, doubting Thomas a lifelong religious sceptic
Quotations
"I am too much of a sceptic to deny the possibility of anything" [T.H. Huxley]

skeptic

also sceptic
noun
One who habitually or instinctively doubts or questions:
Translations
مُتَشَكِّك
skeptik
skeptiker
kételkedõ
efasemdarmaîur
skepticizmasskeptikasskeptiškai
skeptiķis
sceptyczkasceptyk
skeptik
kuşkucu kişi

sceptic

skeptic (US) [ˈskeptɪk] Nescéptico/a m/f

sceptic

[ˈskɛptɪk] (British) skeptic (US) nsceptique mf

sceptic

, (US) skeptic
nSkeptiker(in) m(f)

sceptic

skeptic (Am) [ˈskɛptɪk] nscettico/a

sceptic

(American also skeptic) (ˈskeptik) noun
a person who is unwilling to believe. Most people now accept this theory, but there are a few sceptics.
ˈsceptical adjective
(often with about) unwilling to believe. They say apples clean your teeth, but I'm sceptical about that myself.
ˈsceptically adverb
ˈscepticism (ˈ-sizəm) noun
a doubting or questioning attitude. I regard his theories with scepticism.
References in classic literature ?
Socrates is nowhere represented to us as a freethinker or sceptic.
It is well we have no sceptic here, or he would say that you were working some spell to keep out an evil spirit.
To satisfy himself that this spot was really the centre of the earth, a sceptic once paid well for the privilege of ascending to the dome of the church to see if the sun gave him a shadow at noon.
You're a dreadful sceptic, prince," he continued, after a moment's silence.
Some lesser points of the dialogue may be noted, such as (1) the acute observation that Meno prefers the familiar definition, which is embellished with poetical language, to the better and truer one; or (2) the shrewd reflection, which may admit of an application to modern as well as to ancient teachers, that the Sophists having made large fortunes; this must surely be a criterion of their powers of teaching, for that no man could get a living by shoemaking who was not a good shoemaker; or (3) the remark conveyed, almost in a word, that the verbal sceptic is saved the labour of thought and enquiry (ouden dei to toiouto zeteseos).
Valentin was a sceptic in the severe style of France, and could have no love for priests.
Nevertheless, whatever a sceptic might urge in theory, we cannot practically doubt that we got up this morning, that we did various things yesterday, that a great war has been taking place, and so on.
Being no sceptic, but a moral creature, he was in a manner at the mercy of his righteous passions.
The last idea was the most revolting, but he was a sceptic, he was young, abstract, and therefore cruel, and so he could not help believing that the last end was the most likely.
Professor Nutt, I believe, is a sceptic on the question of whether hard drugs should be completely banned.
Prof Richard Muller, a physicist and climate change sceptic who founded the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature (Best) project, said he was surprised by the findings of the scientific study set up to address climate change sceptics' concerns about whether human-induced global warming is occurring.