schism


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Related to schism: Great Schism

schism

 (skĭz′əm, sĭz′-)
n.
1. A separation or division into factions: "[He] found it increasingly difficult to maintain party unity in the face of ideological schism over civil rights" (Nick Kotz).
2.
a. A formal breach of union within a religious body, especially a Christian church.
b. The offense of attempting to produce such a breach.

[Middle English scisme, from Old French, from Latin schisma, schismat-, from Greek skhisma, from skhizein, to split; see skei- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: The word schism, which was originally spelled scisme, cisme, and sisme in English, is traditionally pronounced (sĭz′əm), without a (k) sound. The modern spelling with the h dates back to the 16th century, when the word was respelled to resemble its Latin and Greek ancestors. The pronunciation with (k), (skĭz′əm), was long regarded as incorrect, but it has become so common in both British and American English that it gained acceptability and now predominates in standard American usage. In our 1997 survey, 61 percent of the Usage Panel indicated that they use (skĭz′əm), while 31 percent said they use (sĭz′əm). A smaller number, 8 percent, preferred a third pronunciation, (shĭz′əm). These figures are similar to the percentages in the 1987 survey, suggesting that the two predominant pronunciations should continue to see widespread use for the foreseeable future.

schism

(ˈskɪzəm; ˈsɪz-)
n
1. the division of a group into opposing factions
2. the factions so formed
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) division within or separation from an established Church, esp the Roman Catholic Church, not necessarily involving differences in doctrine
[C14: from Church Latin schisma, from Greek skhisma a cleft, from skhizein to split]

schism

(ˈsɪz əm, ˈskɪz-)

n.
1. division or disunion, esp. into mutually opposed parties.
2. the parties so formed.
3.
a. a formal division within, or separation from, a church or religious body over some doctrinal difference.
b. the state of a sect or body formed by such division.
c. the offense of causing or seeking to cause such a division.
[1350–1400; < Middle French < Late Latin (Vulgate) sc(h)isma (s. sc(h)ismat-) < Greek, derivative of schízein to split, with -ma n. suffix of result]

schism

a division especially peculiar to a Christian church or a religious body. — schismatic, n. — schismatical, adj.
See also: Religion

Schism

1054, the formal separation between the Orthodox (eastern) and the Roman Catholic (western) Churches.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.schism - division of a group into opposing factions; "another schism like that and they will wind up in bankruptcy"
division - the act or process of dividing
2.schism - the formal separation of a church into two churches or the withdrawal of one group over doctrinal differences
falling out, severance, rupture, rift, breach, break - a personal or social separation (as between opposing factions); "they hoped to avoid a break in relations"

schism

noun division, break, split, breach, separation, rift, splintering, rupture, discord, disunion The church seems to be on the brink of schism.

schism

noun
1. An interruption in friendly relations:
3. The condition of being divided, as in opinion:
Translations

schism

[ˈsɪzəm, ˈskɪzəm] Ncisma m

schism

[ˈskɪzəm ˈsɪzəm] nschisme m

schism

n (Eccl) → Schisma nt; (general also) → Spaltung f

schism

[ˈsɪzm, ˈskɪzm] nscisma m
References in classic literature ?
During the course of these troubles, the emperors of Blefusca did frequently expostulate by their ambassadors, accusing us of making a schism in religion, by offending against a fundamental doctrine of our great prophet Lustrog, in the fifty-fourth chapter of the Blundecral (which is their Alcoran).
the hermetic symbolism, with which Nicolas Flamel played the prelude to Luther, papal unity, schism, Saint-Germain des Prés, Saint-Jacques de la Boucherie,--all are mingled, combined, amalgamated in Notre-Dame.
During the Revolution, the Concordat occasioned an unimportant schism, a little segregation of ultra-catholics who refused to recognize the Bishops appointed by the authorities with the consent of the Pope.
There had been a schism among the Chosen People a few months before, some of the younger members of the Church having rebelled against the authority of the Elders, and the result had been the secession of a certain number of the malcontents, who had left Utah and become Gentiles.
But heresies have polluted every church, and schisms are the fruit of disputation.
They resembled each other in person, dress, language, and manner; and were probably from the same stock, but broken into tribes, or rather hordes, by those feuds and schisms frequent among Indians.
For the former; it is certain, that heresies, and schisms, are of all others the greatest scandals; yea, more than corruption of manners.
I found the new Institution torn by internal schisms even before it was opened to the public.
Protestantism sat at ease, unmindful of schisms, careless of proselytism: Dissent was an inheritance along with a superior pew and a business connection; and Churchmanship only wondered contemptuously at Dissent as a foolish habit that clung greatly to families in the grocery and chandlering lines, though not incompatible with prosperous wholesale dealing.
The Battle for Darracia is a fantastic saga about a once peaceful world threatened by schism and possibly even war by an increasing gulf between social groups.
Summary: Head of the Future bloc MP Fouad Siniora held talks in Cairo Monday with Egypt's Muslim and Christian spiritual leaders, on Islamic extremism, inter-Muslim relations, the growing Sunni-Shiite schism, and ties between Christians and Muslims.
When these countries ask for security cooperation, then it seems to me there is a schism between the political and security leadership.