schizoid personality disorder


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schizoid personality disorder

n.
A personality disorder characterized by indifference to forming relationships with others, reclusiveness, and a cold, detached affect.
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The first medically attested psychopathological manifestations occurred around the age of 28: the patient was diagnosed initially with schizoid personality disorder, because he met the specific diagnostic criteria and he had a satisfactory professional functionality, while exhibiting social withdrawal, avoiding solid inter-human relationships and communication (also encouraged by the nature of his meteorological profession).
1998, Schizoid personality disorder in childhood: The links with Asperger syndrome, schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and elective mutism, in Schopler, E.
An unexpected finding," added Nathan, "was that this parent-child influence appears strongest in the female parent-female child pairing, where it was most influential in yielding heightened risk for mania, nicotine dependence, alcohol abuse, and schizoid personality disorder.
DSM-IV featured, among others Dysthymic Disorder [defined by the online Mental Health Encyclopedia as "a mood disorder with chronic (long-term) depressive symptoms that are present most of the day, more days than not, for a period of at least two years"], Oppositional Defiant Disorder ("an ongoing pattern of disobedient, hostile and defiant behavior toward authority figures which goes beyond the bounds of normal childhood behavior"), and Schizoid Personality Disorder ("a condition characterized by excessive detachment from social relationships and a restricted range of expression of emotions in interpersonal settings").
Many clinicians historically just followed the symptoms in an attempt to treat patients with personality disorders, perhaps leaning toward atypical antipsychotics for Cluster A disorders (paranoid personality disorder, schizoid personality disorder, and schizotypal personality disorder); anticonvulsants and mood stabilizers for Cluster B (antisocial personality disorder, borderline personality disorder, histrionic personality disorder, and narcissistic personality-disorder); and maybe antidepressants and/or anxiolytic agents for Cluster C disorders (avoidant personality disorder, dependent personality disorder, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder).