scholastic


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scho·las·tic

 (skə-lăs′tĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to schools; academic: scholastic accomplishment.
2. often Scholastic Of, relating to, or characteristic of Scholasticism.
3. Overly subtle or pedantic: "The debates ... between communist and socialist formations [of the unions] on an industrial and labor strategy were often scholastic and tortuous" (Norman Birnbaum).
n.
1. often Scholastic A Scholastic philosopher or theologian.
2. A dogmatist or pedant.

[Latin scholasticus, from Greek skholastikos, learned, studious, from skholazein, to study, from skholē, school; see segh- in Indo-European roots.]

scho·las′ti·cal·ly adv.

scholastic

(skəˈlæstɪk) or

scholastical

adj
1. of, relating to, or befitting schools, scholars, or education
2. pedantic or precise
3. (Historical Terms) (often capital) characteristic of or relating to the medieval Schoolmen
n
4. a student or pupil
5. a person who is given to quibbling or logical subtleties; pedant
6. (Historical Terms) (often capital) a disciple or adherent of scholasticism; Schoolman
7. (Roman Catholic Church)
a. a Jesuit student who is undergoing a period of probation prior to commencing his theological studies
b. the status and position of such a student
8. (Art Terms) a formalist in art
[C16: via Latin from Greek skholastikos devoted to learning, ultimately from skholē school1]
schoˈlastically adv

scho•las•tic

(skəˈlæs tɪk)

adj. Also, scho•las′ti•cal.
1. of or pertaining to schools, scholars, or education.
2. of or pertaining to secondary schools.
3. pedantic.
n.
4. (sometimes cap.) an adherent of scholasticism.
5. a pedantic person.
[1590–1600; < Latin scholasticus < Greek scholastikós studious, learned, derivative of scholázein to be at leisure to study. See school1, -tic]
scho•las′ti•cal•ly, adv.

scholastic

- Based on Latin scholasticus, "devote one's leisure to learning."
See also related terms for leisure.

scholastic

Involving or typical of schools, education, or scholarship.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scholastic - a person who pays more attention to formal rules and book learning than they meritscholastic - a person who pays more attention to formal rules and book learning than they merit
purist - someone who insists on great precision and correctness (especially in the use of words)
bookman, scholar, scholarly person, student - a learned person (especially in the humanities); someone who by long study has gained mastery in one or more disciplines
2.Scholastic - a Scholastic philosopher or theologian
philosopher - a specialist in philosophy
Adj.1.scholastic - of or relating to schools; "scholastic year"
2.scholastic - of or relating to the philosophical doctrine of scholasticism; "scholastic philosophy"

scholastic

adjective learned, academic, scholarly, lettered, literary, bookish the values which encouraged her scholastic achievement

scholastic

adjective
Characterized by a narrow concern for book learning and formal rules, without knowledge or experience of practical matters:
Translations

scholastic

[skəˈlæstɪk]
A. ADJ
1. (= educational) → escolar
scholastic bookslibros mpl escolares
the scholastic yearel año escolar
the scholastic professionel magisterio
Scholastic Aptitude Test (US) → examen m de acceso a la universidad
2. (= relative to scholasticism) → escolástico
B. Nescolástico m

scholastic

[skəˈlæstɪk] adj [achievement, ability] → scolaireScholastic Aptitude Test n (US)examen m d'entrée à l'université

scholastic

adj
(= relative to school)schulisch, Schul-; (Univ) → Studien-; her scholastic recordihre schulischen Leistungen, ihre Schulleistungen; (Univ) → ihre Studienleistungen; the scholastic professionder Lehrberuf; scholastic aptitude test (US) Eignungstest vor der Zulassung zu einem College/einer Universität ? also SAT
(= relative to scholasticism)scholastisch

scholastic

[skəˈlæstɪk] adjscolastico/a
References in classic literature ?
I heard that the man with the wooden leg, whose name was Tungay, was an obstinate barbarian who had formerly assisted in the hop business, but had come into the scholastic line with Mr.
They led Don Quixote into a room, and Sancho removed his armour, leaving him in loose Walloon breeches and chamois-leather doublet, all stained with the rust of his armour; his collar was a falling one of scholastic cut, without starch or lace, his buskins buff-coloured, and his shoes polished.
But still further, his education had been so little neglected, even with respect to scholastic studies, so rare at this time among gentlemen, that he smiled at the scraps of Latin which Aramis sported and which Porthos pretended to understand.
One or two of their number had contrived to obtain an air of scholastic gravity by wearing spectacles.
There are scholastic agencies by which one may identify any man who has been in the profession.
That is why I have sternly set my face against any proffered scholastic appointment.
It was late in August; he never played first-class cricket after July, when, a scholastic understudy took his place in the Middlesex eleven.
One of the traits of the new spirit is the inquisition it fixed on our scholastic devotion to the dead languages.
He had the good memory which is more useful for scholastic achievements than mental power, and he knew Mr.
I dare say the great scholastic himself would have been flattered to have his portrait asked for.
Never had he heard such jargon of scholastic philosophy, such fine-drawn distinctions, such cross-fire of major and minor, proposition, syllogism, attack and refutation.
He was a little scholastic shrimp without a drop of red blood in his body.

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