schoole

schoole

(ʃəʊl)
n
an archaic form of shoal1
References in classic literature ?
When he went to schoole, when he was very young," we are told, "he studied hard and sate up very late: commonly till twelve or one at night.
2) Samuel van Hoogstraten, Inleyding tot de hooghe schoole der schilderkonst: anders de zichtbaere werelt (Rotterdam: By Fransois van Hoogstraeten, 1678), p.
24) John Brinsley, Ludus Literarius: Or, the Grammar Schoole (London, 1612; STC: 3768), G3v.
I have chosen for analysis a popular manual of proper conduct for young boys, entitled The Schoole of Vertue (henceforth The Schoole), issued in several editions between 1582 and 1687 by various London publishers.
Furthermore, the parson, so far from being a jumped-up autocrat, ensures that his servants should not be kept in ignorance, but should be educated and made literate, and thus "Those that can read, are allowed times for it, and those that cannot, are taught; for all in his house are either teachers or learners, or both, so that his family is a Schoole of Religion, and they all account, that to teach the ignorant is the greatest almes" (WGH 240).
O sir (quoth he) this is a pleasant baite For men of sorts, to traine them to my schoole.
His most explicit remarks on interpretation tellingly occur in a passage from Positions dealing with "the schoole ordinances betwene the master and his scholers.
President Al-Basher who was accompanied by the Wali (governor) of the Red Sea State, a number of ministers and memebers of the ministers of the state, inaugurated also, five high secondary schoole, four technical schools and other educationalfacilities in the context of Foof for Education Program .
22) A year previously, Harington had indeed published his translation of the medieval medical poem Regimen Sanitatis Salernitanum as The Englishmans Docter, or, the Schoole of Salerne (London, 1607).
When the Sergeant surprises his interlocutors by his erudition, he says simply, "I doe remember what I learn't at Schoole / In Ouid" (sig.
IM SOTTING IN THE MIDDLE OF SCHOOLE I CANT BREATH - amanda (@longlivelorde) (https://twitter.
In its educational function Hesperides resembles a complement-school, as staged in James Shirley's play The Schoole of Complement (1631), for pupils who wish "to suck the hony of [its] eloquence" (sig.