schoolfellow


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school·fel·low

 (sko͞ol′fĕl′ō)
n.
A schoolmate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.schoolfellow - an acquaintance that you go to school withschoolfellow - an acquaintance that you go to school with
acquaintance, friend - a person with whom you are acquainted; "I have trouble remembering the names of all my acquaintances"; "we are friends of the family"
Translations
رَفيق الدِّراسَه، زَميل
spolužák
klassekammeratskolekammerat
skólafélagi
okul arkadaşı

schoolfellow

[ˈskuːlˌfeləʊ] Ncompañero/a m/f de clase

school1

(skuːl) noun
1. a place for teaching especially children. She goes to the school; He's not at university – he's still at school; (American) He's still in school.
2. the pupils of a school. The behaviour of this school in public is sometimes not very good.
3. a series of meetings or a place for instruction etc. She runs a sewing school; a driving school.
4. a department of a university or college dealing with a particular subject. the School of Mathematics.
5. (American) a university or college.
6. a group of people with the same ideas etc. There are two schools of thought about the treatment of this disease.
verb
to train through practice. We must school ourselves to be patient.
ˈschoolbag noun
a bag for carrying books etc to and from school. She had a schoolbag on her back.
ˈschoolboy, ˈschoolgirl nouns
a boy or girl who goes to school.
ˈschoolchild nounplural ˈschoolchildren
a child who goes to school.
ˈschool-day noun
a day on which children go to school. On a school-day I get up at seven o'clock.
ˈschooldays noun plural
the time of a person's life during which he goes to school.
ˈschoolfellow noun
a person who is or was taught at the same school, especially in the same class. I met an old schoolfellow of yours.
ˈschool-leaver noun
a school-pupil who is about to leave, or has just left, school eg because he has finished his course of education there.
ˈschoolmaster nounfeminine ˈschoolmistress
a person who teaches in school.
ˈschoolmate noun
a schoolfellow, especially a friend.
ˈschool-teacher noun
a person who teaches in a school.
References in classic literature ?
I had however one other acquaintance of a sort, Simonov, who was an old schoolfellow.
Tom saw no reason why they should not make up this quarrel as they had done many others, by behaving as if nothing had happened; for though he had never before said to Philip that his father was a rogue, this idea had so habitually made part of his feeling as to the relation between himself and his dubious schoolfellow, who he could neither like nor dislike, that the mere utterance did not make such an epoch to him as it did to Philip.
When Maggie came, however, she could not help looking with growing interest at the new schoolfellow, although he was the son of that wicked Lawyer Wakem, who made her father so angry.
They were not much interested in anything relative to Anne; but still there were questions enough asked, to make it understood what this old schoolfellow was; and Elizabeth was disdainful, and Sir Walter severe.
Her kind, compassionate visits to this old schoolfellow, sick and reduced, seemed to have quite delighted Mr Elliot.
Allen immediately recognized the features of a former schoolfellow and intimate, whom she had seen only once since their respective marriages, and that many years ago.
A schoolfellow of Vronsky's and of the same age, he was a general and was expecting a command, which might have influence on the course of political events; while Vronsky, independent and brilliant and beloved by a charming woman though he was, was simply a cavalry captain who was readily allowed to be as independent as ever he liked.
Hold out your other hand, sir," roars Cuff to his little schoolfellow, whose face was distorted with pain.
After a few months, he left the school where he had been so unhappy, and went to Birmingham to be near an old schoolfellow.
A BOY stole a lesson-book from one of his schoolfellows and took it home to his Mother.
Emily's commanding spirit seized on the reins of government, and employed each of her schoolfellows in the occupation which she was fittest to undertake.
In the afternoon several young girls of Marlott, former schoolfellows and acquaintances of Tess, called to see her, arriving dressed in their best starched and ironed, as became visitors to a person who had made a transcendent conquest (as they supposed), and sat round the room looking at her with great curiosity.