schoolfellow

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school·fel·low

 (sko͞ol′fĕl′ō)
n.
A schoolmate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.schoolfellow - an acquaintance that you go to school withschoolfellow - an acquaintance that you go to school with
acquaintance, friend - a person with whom you are acquainted; "I have trouble remembering the names of all my acquaintances"; "we are friends of the family"
Translations
رَفيق الدِّراسَه، زَميل
spolužák
klassekammeratskolekammerat
skólafélagi
okul arkadaşı

schoolfellow

[ˈskuːlˌfeləʊ] Ncompañero/a m/f de clase

school1

(skuːl) noun
1. a place for teaching especially children. She goes to the school; He's not at university – he's still at school; (American) He's still in school.
2. the pupils of a school. The behaviour of this school in public is sometimes not very good.
3. a series of meetings or a place for instruction etc. She runs a sewing school; a driving school.
4. a department of a university or college dealing with a particular subject. the School of Mathematics.
5. (American) a university or college.
6. a group of people with the same ideas etc. There are two schools of thought about the treatment of this disease.
verb
to train through practice. We must school ourselves to be patient.
ˈschoolbag noun
a bag for carrying books etc to and from school. She had a schoolbag on her back.
ˈschoolboy, ˈschoolgirl nouns
a boy or girl who goes to school.
ˈschoolchild nounplural ˈschoolchildren
a child who goes to school.
ˈschool-day noun
a day on which children go to school. On a school-day I get up at seven o'clock.
ˈschooldays noun plural
the time of a person's life during which he goes to school.
ˈschoolfellow noun
a person who is or was taught at the same school, especially in the same class. I met an old schoolfellow of yours.
ˈschool-leaver noun
a school-pupil who is about to leave, or has just left, school eg because he has finished his course of education there.
ˈschoolmaster nounfeminine ˈschoolmistress
a person who teaches in school.
ˈschoolmate noun
a schoolfellow, especially a friend.
ˈschool-teacher noun
a person who teaches in a school.
References in classic literature ?
And when it come to character, warn't it Compeyson as had been to the school, and warn't it his schoolfellows as was in this position and in that, and warn't it him as had been know'd by witnesses in such clubs and societies, and nowt to his disadvantage?
In short, I parted from my schoolfellows as soon as I got out into the world.
We have been boys together -- schoolfellows -- And now are friends -- yet shall not be so long -- For in the eternal city thou shalt do me A kind and gentle office, and a Power -- A Power august, benignant and supreme -- Shall then absolve thee of all further duties Unto thy friend.
You thought, Muscari, I was the failure among our schoolfellows," he said, "and you thought you were the success.
In the afternoon several young girls of Marlott, former schoolfellows and acquaintances of Tess, called to see her, arriving dressed in their best starched and ironed, as became visitors to a person who had made a transcendent conquest (as they supposed), and sat round the room looking at her with great curiosity.
Besides he would be known to a certain extent among old schoolfellows, and he wanted to get away from them all.
Emily's commanding spirit seized on the reins of government, and employed each of her schoolfellows in the occupation which she was fittest to undertake.
A BOY stole a lesson-book from one of his schoolfellows and took it home to his Mother.
At Eton his hatred of tyranny was fiercely aroused by the fagging system and the other brutalities of an English school; he broke into open revolt and became known as 'mad Shelley,' and his schoolfellows delighted in driving him into paroxysms of rage.
In consequence of Dobbin's victory, his character rose prodigiously in the estimation of all his schoolfellows, and the name of Figs, which had been a byword of reproach, became as respectable and popular a nickname as any other in use in the school.
Jacob's fortitude deserted him at the double disappearance of his schoolfellows and his prospect of dinner.
Here we stand, by no previous appointment or arrangement, three old schoolfellows, in Westminster Hall; three old boarders in a remarkably dull and shady seminary at Saint Omer's, where you, being Catholics and of necessity educated out of England, were brought up; and where I, being a promising young Protestant at that time, was sent to learn the French tongue from a native of Paris