schtick


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Related to schtick: Schick

schtick

 (shtĭk)
n.
Variant of shtick.

schtick

or

schtik

n
a variant form of shtick

shtick

or shtik

(ʃtɪk)

n. Slang.
1. a show-business routine or piece of business inserted to gain a laugh or draw attention to oneself.
2. one's special interest, talent, etc.
[1955–60; < Yiddish shtik pranks, whims, literally, piece < Middle High German stücke, Old High German stucki (German Stück); compare stucco]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.schtick - (Yiddish) a little; a piece; "give him a shtik cake"; "he's a shtik crazy"; "he played a shtik Beethoven"
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
small indefinite amount, small indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is below average size or magnitude
schtickl, schtikl, shtickl, shtikl - a really little shtik; "have a shtikl cake"
2.schtick - (Yiddish) a contrived and often used bit of business that a performer uses to steal attention; "play it straight with no shtik"
byplay, stage business, business - incidental activity performed by an actor for dramatic effect; "his business with the cane was hilarious"
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
3.schtick - (Yiddish) a prank or piece of clowning; "his shtik made us laugh"
buffoonery, clowning, harlequinade, japery, prank, frivolity - acting like a clown or buffoon
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
4.schtick - (Yiddish) a devious trick; a bit of cheating; "how did you ever fall for a shtik like that?"
fast one, trick - a cunning or deceitful action or device; "he played a trick on me"; "he pulled a fast one and got away with it"
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
Translations

schtick

n (US inf: = routine, act) → Nummer f (inf)
References in periodicals archive ?
While Schwarzenegger's schtick steered clear of his split from Maria Shriver or the baby he had with a longtime maid, he still had plenty of material.
The Arctic Monkeys have been trying to peddle some Sixties by the way of classic rock-style schtick for some time now.
But here the schtick wears a little thin and a clunky plot gets in the way.
Okay, you wouldn't want to book him for a kids' party or anything, but his tortured soul schtick has worked brilliantly on his previous introspective folk-soul stirrings, last heard peaking brilliantly with the hushed, autumnal majesty of 2008's Gossip In The Grain.
Evidently, the joke's on all the hipsters and music snobs who've long dismissed Leon Redbone's retro jazz and Tin Pan Alley vaudeville schtick.
If you like Ritchie's schtick then you will love this because he is in masterful control of his box of tricks.
political schtick one step further by claiming he was going to educate the people by lying to them.
The whole schtick stands as a fitting testament to conceptual restraint, as well as to those hobbling neuroses of the mostly rich and famous.
Moreover, Albert had a great schtick and repartee with his color commentators: Bill "The Big Whistle" Chadwick (the Hall of Fame referee credited with inventing the hand signals for calling penalties) and Sal "Red Light" Messina (a fair-at-best goaltender who toiled in the Rangers minor league system for years).
Then it becomes a schtick that I do and I have to find a way to change again.
The Wrong Gallery (aka Maurizio Cattelan, Massimiliano Gioni, and Ali Subotnick) will once again bring their three-ring schtick to London at the behest of the fair's organizers.
Plastic surgery's a big one, along with the Jewish schtick, aspects of gerontology (that's the study of being old for those of you young enough to grapple with such concepts), insults aimed at showbiz 'friends' and carefully-targeted audience members and, of course, the big gay number.