science fiction


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science fiction

n.
A literary or cinematic genre in which fantasy, typically based on speculative scientific discoveries or developments, environmental changes, space travel, or life on other planets, forms part of the plot or background.

sci′ence-fic′tion adj.

science fiction

n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms)
a. a literary genre that makes imaginative use of scientific knowledge or conjecture
b. (as modifier): a science fiction writer.

sci′ence fic′tion


n.
a form of fiction that draws imaginatively on scientific knowledge and speculation.
[1925–30]

science fiction

  • droid - A robot in science fiction, it is a shortening of android.
  • death ray - Was a staple of (pulp) science fiction in the mid-20th century.
  • time warp - A concept that arose in the 1950s and originally applied to science fiction.
  • warp speed - Alludes to the use in science fiction, especially the speed used for interstellar travel in the science fiction television series Star Trek.

science fiction

(SF) A genre that makes imaginative use of scientific knowledge or conjecture of future scientific development. When this is pseudo-scientific with no grounding in real science, it is often known as science fantasy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.science fiction - literary fantasy involving the imagined impact of science on societyscience fiction - literary fantasy involving the imagined impact of science on society
teleportation - a hypothetical mode of instantaneous transportation; matter is dematerialized at one place and recreated at another
fantasy, phantasy - fiction with a large amount of imagination in it; "she made a lot of money writing romantic fantasies"
cyberpunk - a genre of fast-paced science fiction involving oppressive futuristic computerized societies
teleport - transport by dematerializing at one point and assembling at another
Translations
الخَيال العِلْميخِيَالٌ عِلْمِيّ
science fictionvědecká fantastika
science fiction
tieteiskirjallisuus
znanstvena fantastika
sci-fitudományos-fantasztikus regény
vísindaskáldskapur
サイエンスフィクションフィクション空想科学小説
공상 과학 소설
science fiction
znanstvena fantastika
science fiction
นวนิยายวิทยาศาสตร์
truyện khoa học viễn tưởng

science fiction

nSciencefiction f; science fiction novelZukunftsroman m, → Sciencefictionroman m

science fiction

nfantascienza

science

(ˈsaiəns) noun
1. knowledge gained by observation and experiment.
2. a branch of such knowledge eg biology, chemistry, physics etc.
3. these sciences considered as a whole. My daughter prefers science to languages.
ˌscienˈtific (-ˈti-) adjective
1. of science. scientific dis-coveries.
2. (negative unscientific) following the rules of science. scientific methods.
ˌscienˈtifically (-ˈti-) adverb
ˈscientist noun
a person who studies one or more branches of science.
science fiction abbreviation ( sci-fi)
stories dealing with future times on Earth or in space.

science fiction

خِيَالٌ عِلْمِيّ vědecká fantastika science fiction Sciencefiction επιστημονική φαντασία ciencia ficción tieteiskirjallisuus science fiction znanstvena fantastika fantascienza サイエンスフィクション 공상 과학 소설 sciencefiction science fiction fantastyka naukowa ficção científica научная фантастика science fiction นวนิยายวิทยาศาสตร์ bilim kurgu truyện khoa học viễn tưởng 科幻小说
References in periodicals archive ?
Working with what she calls the "pre-space" age, Haywood Ferreira makes a case for considering science fiction a "global genre" and emphasizes the need to insert Latin American science fiction production in it.
Science fiction has often been on the cutting edge of the cultural and social change, fittingly for a genre of literature that is fundamentally future-oriented.
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Dave Itzkoff notes that science fiction and presidential politics
Rome Quezada, Editor in Chief of the Science Fiction Book Club, the leading science fiction and fantasy book club, kicks off the 2011 holiday season with "Joy to the Nerd" - showcasing his top holiday picks for 2011 in the science fiction space.
To consider science fiction in countries other than the United States, one must start from these shores.
Telotte introduces his project with an essay that traces "The Trajectory of Science Fiction Television" from its inception to the present.
Jan Johnson-Smith, a senior lecturer in film and television theory at Bournemouth University's media school in the United Kingdom, has provided a much-needed analysis of science fiction television through an examination of the narrative and visual patterns that the genre has produced.
Not all science fiction has religious undertones, but there can be similarities between science fiction and religion.
Brigg draws the parameters of span fiction early in the book, asserting that "Science and its muscular sibling, technology, have transformed the world and the way human beings see it and behave in it:" As a consequence, both mainstream fiction and science fiction have seen their boundaries weakened; a number of mainstream fiction writers, Brigg says, "have now turned to explore strange horizons and find opportunities to express parts of their vision that realms new to them (but the stock-in-trade of the science fiction writer) will permit" (5).
The convention, hosted by the North Hollywood-based Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society, highlights ``Exploring the Golden Ages of Science Fiction.
The book has gone really well, so I'm delighted to have made it to Waterstones," said Alan, aged 56, from Handsworth Wood, who has been writing science fiction for 30 years.

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