scientism

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sci·en·tism

 (sī′ən-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. The collection of attitudes and practices considered typical of scientists.
2. The belief that the investigative methods of the physical sciences are applicable or justifiable in all fields of inquiry.

sci′en·tis′tic adj.

scientism

(ˈsaɪənˌtɪzəm)
n
1. the application of, or belief in, the scientific method
2. the uncritical application of scientific or quasi-scientific methods to inappropriate fields of study or investigation
ˌscienˈtistic adj

sci•en•tism

(ˈsaɪ ənˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. the assumptions, methods, etc., regarded as typifying scientists.
2. the belief that the principles and methods of the physical and biological sciences should be applied to other disciplines.
3. scientific or pseudoscientific language.
[1875–80]
sci`en•tis′tic, adj.

scientism

1. Often Disparaging. the style, assumptions, techniques, practices, etc., typifying or regarded as typifying scientists.
2. the belief that the assumptions and methods of the natural sciences are appropriate and essential to all other disciplines, including the humanities and the social sciences.
3. scientific or pseudoscientific language. — scientistic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dalrymple takes his title from King Lear with Edmund's dismissal of scientistic buck passing.
Methodologically the study is principally based on ethnography, albeit in a very "informal" manner without simultaneous note-taking; Amico presumed that his subjects would balk at such scientistic rituals (pp.
This runs the risk of producing a more scientistic rather than scientific economics.
I have always believed that the true predecessors and inspirations for Solzhenitsyn include Christian thinkers such as Soloviev, Bulgakov, and Il'in who, like Solzhenitsyn, drew on the best of the Western intellectual tradition while firmly rejecting those scientistic, atheistic, and subjectivist currents that identified human progress with the triumph of "anthropocentric humanism.
If the towers' rigid geometries and scientistic elegance now seem emblematic of a certain kind of cool midcentury American urbanity and the placid sea of capital on which it bobbed, for Sosnowska--a resident of Warsaw who has made a decadelong project of documenting that city's fluid, richly entropic post-Communist architectural fabric--they also stand in dialogue with the fading utilitarian Soviet-period construction familiar in her hometown.
Ravinthiran concludes this important article by providing close readings of two key journal passages, analyses that reveal deep psychological tensions in their author and also "one sensitive Victorian's response to an increasingly denuded and scientistic understanding of nature, and man's place in it" (856).
I am pleased that AJEE did not follow the preferences of its first editor (and influential commentators like Linke) by over-privileging empirical-analytic and scientistic research reports.
A veritable minefield of problems relate to the regulators' (and industry's) addiction to scientistic thinking--the naive application of physical science models and ways of thinking to social science problems where they do not belong.
Wickberg, "Response to Christopher Shannon" 14, develops this point, noting, 15, that what Shannon proposes is a "return of the humanistic version of history above and beyond the scientistic version .
Nietzsche's naturalism is thus intended to chart a middle way between a dualistic, transcendent metaphysics and a reductive, scientistic naturalism.
Chapter 6 closes the book by arguing that modern secular society promotes, often unwittingly, a scientistic narrative that assumes that all observed social and scientific phenomena can be explained materialistically.
The academic approaches to peace action, peace and anti-war movements, and the goals and methods of peace action evolved slowly and to a large extent outside formal peace research, which had its roots in a more scientistic positivist--and often quantitative--approach to conflict.