scientize

scientize

(ˈsaɪənˌtaɪz) or

scientise

vb (tr)
to treat scientifically, to apply science to something
References in periodicals archive ?
Regardless of the complex and at-times contradictory ways the New Critics viewed modern scientific knowledge--Wellek argues fervently that they were in fact "enemies of science" (108)--earlier pronouncements, such as Ransoms that "criticism must become more scientific, or precise and systematic," (109) nourished the idea that the development of close reading was intimately entwined with attempts to scientize literary study.
By trying to scientize the testimony of people of color, stereotype threat and microaggression research attests to the value of the testimony.
This urgency to scientize intuition is another 21st-century trend: understandable, given the mockery endured by believers in magic.
Acolytes of the occult thus incorporated scientific disciplinary methods into their occult explorations--as with Madame Blavatsky's attempts to scientize her brand of spiritualism--and thereby sought to rationalize the irrational.
Public deliberation must continually negotiate its status, evolve, and reclaim its powers on either side of a divide between forces that would irreparably politicize science or progressively scientize the lifeworld.
But then I saw that the attempt to scientize reality, to name it and categorize it and vivisect it out of existence, was like trying to remove the air from the atmosphere.
Krupat, for instance, points out that when "literary people estheticize science, accuracy and authenticity are inevitably lost in some degree; when anthropologists scientize art, its charm, force, beauty are inevitably lost in some degree.
Put another way, has the attempt to regularize, rationalize, systematize, mechanize - to scientize - the process of education led us to a form of schooling that is antidevelopmental and antieducational?
But I suspect we will find that these sites are only a generative place of controversy, and that there are situations where conceptualizing science and technology controversy as a conflict "between forces that would irreparably politicize science or progressively scientize the lifeworld" (28) is misleading, or too limiting.
Braithwaite (1989: 6) reviews the failure of the dominant policy tendencies that have flowed from the major theories and concludes that criminology `can be unhelpful in maintaining a social climate appropriate to crime control because in different ways its thrust is to professionalize, systematize, scientize, and de-communitize justice'.