scion


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sci·on

 (sī′ən)
n.
1. A descendant or heir, especially of a wealthy or prominent family: scion of the ruling dynasty.
2. Botany A detached shoot or bud from a plant that is joined to a rootstock in grafting.

[Middle English, from Old French cion, possibly of Germanic origin.]

scion

(ˈsaɪən) or

sient

n
1. a descendant, heir, or young member of a family
2. (Botany) a shoot or twig of a plant used to form a graft
[C14: from Old French cion, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German chīnan to sprout]

sci•on

(ˈsaɪ ən)

n.
1. a descendant or offspring, esp. of an illustrious family.
2. a shoot or twig, esp. one cut for grafting or planting.
[1275–1325; Middle English: shoot, twig < Old French cion < Frankish *kī- (compare Old English cīnan, Old Saxon kīnan, Old High German chīnan to sprout, Old English cīth, Old Saxon kīth sprout)]

scion

The bud or stem of a desired variety that is grafted on to the rootstock (root system) of another plant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scion - a descendent or heir; "a scion of royal stock"
descendant, descendent - a person considered as descended from some ancestor or race

scion

noun descendant, child, offspring, successor, heir He was the scion of an aristocratic family that lost its fortune in the revolution.

scion

noun
One descended directly from the same parents or ancestors:
Translations
následníkpotomekroub
jaloversokruununperijäversovesa
descendanthéritier d'un trône
ætlingetterkommerpodekvistskudd
нащадок

scion

[ˈsaɪən] N (Bot, fig) → vástago m
scion of a noble familyvástago m de una familia noble

scion

[ˈsaɪən] n
(= descendant) → rejeton m
(BOTANY)rejeton m

scion

n
(Bot) → Schössling m; (for grafting) → (Pfropf)reis nt
(form)Nachkomme m, → Nachfahr(in) m(f)
References in classic literature ?
The bishop of the diocese, an arrogant scion of the great nobility, claimed the girl's estate on the ground that she had married privately, and thus had cheated the Church out of one of its rights as lord of the seigniory -- the one heretofore referred to as le droit du seigneur.
Cedric, to whom the name of Alfred was as that of a deity, had treated the sole remaining scion of that great monarch with a degree of observance, such as, perhaps, was in those days scarce paid to an acknowledged princess.
If you are a goddess and dwell in heaven, I can only conjecture that you are Jove's daughter Diana, for your face and figure resemble none but hers; if on the other hand you are a mortal and live on earth, thrice happy are your father and mother--thrice happy, too, are your brothers and sisters; how proud and delighted they must feel when they see so fair a scion as yourself going out to a dance; most happy, however, of all will he be whose wedding gifts have been the richest, and who takes you to his own home.
Edward Freely, the orphan, scion of a great but reduced family, with an eccentric uncle in the West Indies.
You, a scion of Seacombe, have proved your disdain of social distinctions by taking up with an ouvriere
to find a case where the scion of an old county family
He was indeed a scion of one of the very oldest families in the kingdom, though his branch was a cadet one which had separated from the northern Musgraves some time in the sixteenth century, and had established itself in western Sussex, where the Manor House of Hurlstone is perhaps the oldest inhabited building in the county.
He was a young prince, the scion of a proud house that traced its lineage back to the grand old days of Rome well nigh two thousand years ago.
As they leaned over, both little faces were mirrored on the placid pool; the fierce and terrible features of the ape beside those of the aristocratic scion of an old English house.
A strange thing has happened to a scion of our defunct aristocracy.
It seemed to her that it could be such an easy thing for any girl to love Lieutenant Harold Percy Smith-Oldwick--an English officer and a gentleman, the scion of an old family and himself a man of ample means, young, good-looking and affable.
Here birth caused no distinctions; the escaped serf, with the gall marks of his brass collar still visible about his neck, rode shoulder to shoulder with the outlawed scion of a noble house.