scissors


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scis·sor

 (sĭz′ər)
tr.v. scis·sored, scis·sor·ing, scis·sors
To cut or clip with scissors or shears.
n.
1. scissors(used with a sing. or pl. verb) A cutting implement consisting of two blades joined by a swivel pin that allows the cutting edges to be opened and closed.
2. scissors(used with a sing. verb) Sports
a. Any of various gymnastic exercises or jumps in which the movement of the legs suggests the opening and closing of scissors.
b. A scissors hold.

[From alteration (influenced by Latin scissor, cutter) of Middle English sisours, scissors, from Old French cisoires, from Vulgar Latin *cīsōria, from Late Latin, pl. of cīsōrium, cutting instrument, from Latin caesus, -cīsus, past participle of caedere, to cut; see kaə-id- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

scissors

(ˈsɪzəz)
pl n
1. Also called: pair of scissors a cutting instrument used for cloth, hair, etc, having two crossed pivoted blades that cut by a shearing action, with ring-shaped handles at one end
2. (Wrestling) a wrestling hold in which a wrestler wraps his legs round his opponent's body or head, locks his feet together, and squeezes
3. (Gymnastics) any gymnastic or athletic feat in which the legs cross and uncross in a scissor-like movement
4. (Athletics (Track & Field)) athletics a technique in high-jumping, now little used, in which the legs perform a scissor-like movement in clearing the bar
[C14 sisoures, from Old French cisoires, from Vulgar Latin cīsōria (unattested), ultimately from Latin caedere to cut; see chisel]
ˈscissor-ˌlike adj

scis•sors

(ˈsɪz ərz)

n.
1. (used with a sing. or pl. v.) a cutting instrument for paper, cloth, etc., consisting of two blades, each having a ring-shaped handle, that are so pivoted together that their sharp edges work one against the other (often used with pair of).
2. (used with a sing. v.)
a. any of several gymnastic feats in which the legs execute a scissorlike motion.
b. a wrestling hold secured by clasping the legs around the body or head of the opponent.
[1350–1400; Middle English cisoures, sisoures < Middle French cisoires < Vulgar Latin *cīsōria, pl. of Late Latin cīsōrium cutting tool (see chisel)]
scis′sor•like`, adj.

scissors

Scissors are a small tool consisting of two sharp blades joined together, used for cutting things such as paper, cloth, or hair.

Scissors is a plural noun. Don't talk about 'a scissors'. Instead say some scissors or a pair of scissors.

I need some scissors to get this label off.
She took a pair of scissors and cut his hair.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scissors - an edge tool having two crossed pivoting bladesscissors - an edge tool having two crossed pivoting blades
blade - the flat part of a tool or weapon that (usually) has a cutting edge
clipper - scissors for cutting hair or finger nails (often used in the plural)
compound lever - a pair of levers hinged at the fulcrum
edge tool - any cutting tool with a sharp cutting edge (as a chisel or knife or plane or gouge)
shears - large scissors with strong blades
snuffers - scissors for cropping and holding the snuff of a candlewick
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
2.scissors - a wrestling hold in which you wrap your legs around the opponents body or head and put your feet together and squeeze
wrestling hold - a hold used in the sport of wrestling
3.scissors - a gymnastic exercise performed on the pommel horse when the gymnast moves his legs as the blades of scissors move
gymnastic exercise - (gymnastics) an exercise designed to develop and display strength and agility and balance (usually performed with or on some gymnastic apparatus)
Translations
مقصمِقَصمِقَصّ
ножица
nůžky
saks
sakset
škarenožice
olló
gunting
skæri
はさみ
가위
žirklės
šķēres
škarje
sax
กรรไกร
kéo

scissors

[ˈsɪzəz]
A. NPLtijeras fpl
a pair of scissorsunas tijeras
B. CPD scissors jump Ntijera f
scissors kick Nchilena f, tijereta f

scissors

[ˈsɪzərz] npl
(= tool) → ciseaux mpl
a pair of scissors → une paire de ciseaux
(in gymnastics)ciseau m

scissors

n
plSchere f; a pair of scissorseine Schere
sing (Sport, also scissors jump) → Schersprung m; (also scissors hold)Schere f

scissors

[ˈsɪzəz] nplforbici fpl
a pair of scissors → un paio di forbici

scissors

(ˈsizəz) noun plural
a type of cutting instrument with two blades. a pair of scissors.

scissors

مِقَصّ nůžky saks Schere ψαλίδι tijeras sakset ciseaux škare forbici はさみ 가위 schaar saks nożyce tesoura ножницы sax กรรไกร makas kéo 剪刀

scis·sors

n., pl. tijeras.

scissors

npl tijeras; a pair of scissors.. unas tijeras; bandage — tijeras para vendajes; nail — tijeras de or para uñas
References in classic literature ?
In the present instance there was no escape, and having clashed her scissors rebelliously, while protesting that she smelled thunder, she gave in, put away her work, and taking up her hat and gloves with an air of resignation, told Amy the victim was ready.
Going to a cloth bag that hung on a nail by the wall she took out a long pair of sewing scissors and held them in her hand like a dagger.
Madame Ratignolle folded her sewing, placing thimble, scissors, and thread all neatly together in the roll, which she pinned securely.
Children came running with their mothers' scissors, or the carving-knife, or the paternal razor, or anything else that lacked an edge (except, indeed, poor Clifford's wits), that the grinder might apply the article to his magic wheel, and give it back as good as new.
Their brisk, withered little dames, in close crimped caps, long waisted short-gowns, homespun petticoats, with scissors and pin-cushions, and gay calico pockets hanging on the outside.
Bird opened a wardrobe, and, taking from thence a plain, serviceable dress or two, she sat down busily to her work-table, and, with needle, scissors, and thimble, at hand, quietly commenced the "letting down" process which her husband had recommended, and continued busily at it till the old clock in the corner struck twelve, and she heard the low rattling of wheels at the door.
The latest news (two days old) follows the four-line sermon, under the pica headline "Telegrams"--these are "telegraphed" with a pair of scissors out of the AUGSBURGER ZEITUNG of the day before.
The pleasantness of the morning had induced him to walk forward, and leave his horses to meet him by another road, a mile or two beyond Highbury and happening to have borrowed a pair of scissors the night before of Miss Bates, and to have forgotten to restore them, he had been obliged to stop at her door, and go in for a few minutes: he was therefore later than he had intended; and being on foot, was unseen by the whole party till almost close to them.
Last night after tea, when you and mama went out of the room, they were whispering and talking together as fast as could be, and he seemed to be begging something of her, and presently he took up her scissors and cut off a long lock of her hair, for it was all tumbled down her back; and he kissed it, and folded it up in a piece of white paper; and put it into his pocket-book.
Long did the hours seem while I waited the departure of the company, and listened for the sound of Bessie's step on the stairs: sometimes she would come up in the interval to seek her thimble or her scissors, or perhaps to bring me something by way of supper--a bun or a cheese-cake--then she would sit on the bed while I ate it, and when I had finished, she would tuck the clothes round me, and twice she kissed me, and said, "Good night, Miss Jane.
It makes a dog fiercer, and I love something fierce - get me a scissors - something fierce and trim
Steadying herself against the post of the folding-door, she took a pair of scissors from her pocket, waited until Noel Vanstone (from whose view she was entirely hidden) had attracted Magdalen's attention by speaking to her, and then bent forward, with the scissors ready in her hand.