scold


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scold

 (skōld)
v. scold·ed, scold·ing, scolds
v.tr.
To reprimand or criticize harshly and usually angrily.
v.intr.
To express harsh or angry disapproval to someone.
n.
One who persistently nags or criticizes: "As a critic gets older, he or she usually grows more tetchy and ... may even become a big-league scold" (James Wolcott).

[Middle English scolden, to be abusive, from scolde, an abusive person, probably of Scandinavian origin; see sekw- in Indo-European roots.]

scold′er n.
scold′ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: scold, upbraid, berate, revile, vituperate, rail3
These verbs mean to reprimand or criticize angrily or vehemently. Scold implies reproof: parents who scolded their child for being rude. Upbraid generally suggests a well-founded reproach, as one leveled by an authority: upbraided by the supervisor for habitual tardiness. Berate suggests scolding or rebuking at length: "Sergeant Olds ... berated a candidate at the far end of the squad bay for having scuffs on his boots" (Nathaniel Fick).
Revile and vituperate especially stress the use of scornful or abusive language: "Hamilton was reviled in his time by Jeffersonian democrats as an evil genius in thrall to wealthy aristocracies" (Walter Isaacson). "The incensed priests ... continued to raise their voices, vituperating each other in bad Latin" (Sir Walter Scott).
Rail suggests bitter, harsh, or denunciatory language: "Conservatives had railed against the liberal interest groups that had attacked [him]" (Jane Mayer).
Word History: The Middle English verb scolden, the source of Modern English scold, is derived from the Middle English noun scold, which meant primarily "a person of ribald and abusive speech" and "a shrewish, chiding woman." Scold is probably of Scandinavian origin and akin to Old Icelandic skāld, "poet." Middle English scold could perhaps also be used to mean simply "a minstrel," but of that we are not sure. What is the link, then, between the more usual meanings of Middle English scold, such as "a person of abusive speech," and the meaning of the Old Icelandic skāld, "poet"? The relationship between the two words becomes clearer if we examine the senses of some Old Icelandic words derived from skāld. Old Icelandic skāldskapr, for example, meant "poetry" in a good sense but also "a libel in verse," while skāldstöng meant "a pole with imprecations or charms scratched on it." Satirical and scurrilous verses have formed a noted part of poets' productions in traditional societies throughout the ages. The prominence of the poet in the role of satirist and composer of curses explains how English scold, "one who persistently nags or criticizes" could be akin to Old Icelandic skāld, "poet." The original meaning of the Scandinavian source of Middle English scold may have been "poet, especially one who composes satirical verses," and after the word was borrowed into English, the poetry was forgotten and only the curses remained.

scold

(skəʊld)
vb
1. to find fault with or reprimand (a person) harshly; chide
2. (intr) to use harsh or abusive language
n
a person, esp a woman, who constantly finds fault
[C13: from Old Norse skald]
ˈscoldable adj
ˈscolder n
ˈscolding n
ˈscoldingly adv

scold

(skoʊld)

v.t.
1. to find fault with angrily; chide; reprimand.
v.i.
2. to find fault angrily; reprove.
3. to use abusive language.
n.
4. a person who is constantly scolding, often with loud and abusive speech.
[1150–1200; (n.) < Old Norse skāld poet (as satirist); see skald]
scold′er, n.

scold


Past participle: scolded
Gerund: scolding

Imperative
scold
scold
Present
I scold
you scold
he/she/it scolds
we scold
you scold
they scold
Preterite
I scolded
you scolded
he/she/it scolded
we scolded
you scolded
they scolded
Present Continuous
I am scolding
you are scolding
he/she/it is scolding
we are scolding
you are scolding
they are scolding
Present Perfect
I have scolded
you have scolded
he/she/it has scolded
we have scolded
you have scolded
they have scolded
Past Continuous
I was scolding
you were scolding
he/she/it was scolding
we were scolding
you were scolding
they were scolding
Past Perfect
I had scolded
you had scolded
he/she/it had scolded
we had scolded
you had scolded
they had scolded
Future
I will scold
you will scold
he/she/it will scold
we will scold
you will scold
they will scold
Future Perfect
I will have scolded
you will have scolded
he/she/it will have scolded
we will have scolded
you will have scolded
they will have scolded
Future Continuous
I will be scolding
you will be scolding
he/she/it will be scolding
we will be scolding
you will be scolding
they will be scolding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been scolding
you have been scolding
he/she/it has been scolding
we have been scolding
you have been scolding
they have been scolding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been scolding
you will have been scolding
he/she/it will have been scolding
we will have been scolding
you will have been scolding
they will have been scolding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been scolding
you had been scolding
he/she/it had been scolding
we had been scolding
you had been scolding
they had been scolding
Conditional
I would scold
you would scold
he/she/it would scold
we would scold
you would scold
they would scold
Past Conditional
I would have scolded
you would have scolded
he/she/it would have scolded
we would have scolded
you would have scolded
they would have scolded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scold - someone (especially a woman) who annoys people by constantly finding faultscold - someone (especially a woman) who annoys people by constantly finding fault
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
harridan - a scolding (even vicious) old woman
Verb1.scold - censure severely or angrilyscold - censure severely or angrily; "The mother scolded the child for entering a stranger's car"; "The deputy ragged the Prime Minister"; "The customer dressed down the waiter for bringing cold soup"
castigate, chasten, chastise, objurgate, correct - censure severely; "She chastised him for his insensitive remarks"
brush down, tell off - reprimand; "She told the misbehaving student off"
criticise, criticize, pick apart, knock - find fault with; express criticism of; point out real or perceived flaws; "The paper criticized the new movie"; "Don't knock the food--it's free"
2.scold - show one's unhappiness or critical attitude; "He scolded about anything that he thought was wrong"; "We grumbled about the increased work load"
kvetch, plain, quetch, complain, sound off, kick - express complaints, discontent, displeasure, or unhappiness; "My mother complains all day"; "She has a lot to kick about"

scold

verb reprimand, censure, rebuke, rate, blame, lecture, carpet (informal), slate (informal, chiefly Brit.), nag, go on at, reproach, berate, tick off (informal), castigate, chide, tear into (informal), tell off (informal), find fault with, remonstrate with, bring (someone) to book, take (someone) to task, read the riot act, reprove, upbraid, bawl out (informal), give (someone) a talking-to (informal), haul (someone) over the coals (informal), chew out (U.S. & Canad. informal), give (someone) a dressing-down, tear (someone) off a strip (Brit. informal), give a rocket (Brit. & N.Z. informal), vituperate, give (someone) a row, have (someone) on the carpet (informal) If he finds out, he'll scold me.
reprimand approve, praise, acclaim, applaud, compliment, commend, laud, extol

scold

verb
To criticize for a fault or an offense:
Informal: bawl out, lambaste.
Slang: chew out.
Idioms: bring to task, call on the carpet, haul over the coals, let someone have it.
noun
A person, traditionally a woman, who persistently nags or criticizes:
Informal: battle-ax.
Translations
يُعَنِّفُيُوَبِّخ، يُعَنِّف
hubovatvynadat
skælde udskænde
moittianuhdellatorua
prekoriti
megszid
skamma
しかる
꾸짖다
griežtas išbarimas
bārt
vynadať
ošteti
skälla på
ดุว่า
trách mắng

scold

[skəʊld]
A. VTreñir, regañar (for por)
B. N (= woman) → virago f

scold

[ˈskəʊld] vtsermonner

scold

vt(aus)schelten, ausschimpfen (for wegen); she scolded him for coming home latesie schimpfte ihn aus, weil er so spät heimgekommen war
vischimpfen
n (= person)Beißzange f (inf); (= woman also)Xanthippe f (inf)

scold

[skəʊld] vt to scold sb (for doing sth)sgridare qn (per aver fatto qc)

scold

(skəuld) verb
to criticize or blame loudly and angrily. She scolded the child for coming home so late.
ˈscolding noun
a stern or angry rebuke. I got a scolding for doing careless work.

scold

يُعَنِّفُ vynadat skælde ud schelten κατσαδιάζω regañar moittia gronder prekoriti sgridare しかる 꾸짖다 uitvaren tegen kjefte (på) złajać ralhar бранить skälla på ดุว่า azarlamak trách mắng 责骂
References in classic literature ?
The biggest coward I ever knew as called Lyon; and his wife, Patience, would scold you out of hearing in less time than a hunted deer would run a rod.
Would she be decent to him, or would she scold him?
WELL, I got a good going-over in the morning from old Miss Watson on account of my clothes; but the widow she didn't scold, but only cleaned off the grease and clay, and looked so sorry that I thought I would behave awhile if I could.
I'd let her scold me all day long, for she understands; but she can't stand up for me against aunt Mirandy; she's about as afraid of her as I am.
They'll loudly talk of Christ's reward, And bind his image with a cord, And scold, and swing the lash abhorred, And sell their brother in the Lord To handcuffed heavenly union.
I should scold her myself, if she were capable of wishing to check the delight of your conversation with our new friend.
When thus gentle, Bessie seemed to me the best, prettiest, kindest being in the world; and I wished most intensely that she would always be so pleasant and amiable, and never push me about, or scold, or task me unreasonably, as she was too often wont to do.
He was a cheerful man, poor soul; and thoughtful of us, too: he never came in and stared at meal-times; the rest of 'em help us, and scold us -- all he ever said was, better luck next time.
I shall begin to assert the privileges of a mother-in-law, if you go on like that, and scold you.
Whether you scold me or approve of me," returned poor Biddy, "you may equally depend upon my trying to do all that lies in my power, here, at all times.
There is a man among the People of the Axe who has a jade and a scold for a wife," said Umslopogaas, springing up.
asked Chee- Chee; and he began to scold the parrot for letting them get lost while he was away looking for the cocoanuts.