scolytid

scolytid

(ˈskɒlɪtɪd) or

scolytoid

n
(Zoology) any of various dark-coloured cylinder-shaped beetles, including the bark and ambrosia beetles
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the topics are cultivating medical and aromatic plants in saline environments, hydrogen sulphide and signaling in plants, improving bioethanol production by increasing sugar beet crop yield, detecting and measuring plant disease symptoms using visible-wavelength photography and image analysis, plant mutation breeding in agriculture, macroalgae and their potential for biofuel, assessing the safety of biological control introductions, managing farmland flora to promote biodiversity in Europe, epigenetics and plant breeding, and options for controlling scolytid beetles that attack pines.
All around the second-growth vegetation, the fallen trees and branches rot and crumble offering hiding places and food to a vast array of basidiomycete fungi, slime molds, ponerine ants, scolytid beetles, bark lice, earwigs, embiopteran web spinners, zorapterans, entomobryomorph springtails, japygid diplurans, schizomid arachnids, pseudoscorpions, real scorpions, and other forms that live mostly or exclusively in this habitat.
Collections from infrequently-sampled sites in Indiana, and collections of non-target beetles that were taken as a result of exotic scolytid trapping efforts by the United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine (USDA APHIS PPQ) and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources were recently studied.
A multiple funnel trap for scolytid beetles (Coleoptera).
However, when the analysis was done comparing scolytid emergence by bolt volume, the results were similar to those those expressed on table 4 (df = 2,27; F = 4.
In some insect species, particularly some scolytid species, low-density aggregation could confer reproductive benefits to individual female insects by overcoming host plant defenses (Raffa & Berryman 1983) or improving host plant quality through the introduction of symbiotic microbes (Whitney 1982).
Susceptibility to attack by biological agents focused mainly on the incidence of fungi (Wazny and Krajewski 1984, Niemz and Kucera 2000, Zurcher 2003), wood-destroying insects (Niemz and Kucera 2000), and scolytids (Jahn 1982).
Important pests such as the pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Steiner and Buhrer) Nickle, lots of Scolytids or the Asian Longhorned Beetle Anoplophora glabripennis (Motchulsky), benefited from the transport of WPM to colonize new habitats (see, respectively, Allen 2001, Mudge et al.
Evaluation of three trap types and five lures for monitoring Hylurgus ligniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and other local scolytids in New York.