scoop


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scoop
left to right: flour and ice-cream scoops

scoop

 (sko͞op)
n.
1.
a. A shovellike utensil, usually having a deep curved dish and a short handle: a flour scoop.
b. A thick-handled cuplike utensil for dispensing balls of ice cream or other semisoft food, often having a sweeping band in the cup that is levered by the thumb to free the contents.
c. A ladle; a dipper.
d. An implement for bailing water from a boat.
e. A narrow, spoon-shaped instrument for surgical extraction in cavities or cysts.
f. A bucket or shovel of a dredge, backhoe, or other digging machine.
g. The amount that any of these utensils, implements, or containers can hold: ate two scoops of ice cream.
2. A scooping movement or action: made a nice scoop to catch the ball.
3. Informal
a. An exclusive news story acquired by luck or initiative before a competitor.
b. Current information or details: What's the scoop on the new neighbors?
4. A rounded, usually low-cut neckline, as on a blouse or dress. Also called scoop neck, scoop neckline.
5. A hollow area; a cavity.
6. An opening, as on the body of a motor vehicle, by which a fluid is directed inward: "The [sports car] has ... enough scoops and spoilers to get you a citation just standing still" (Mark Weinstein).
tr.v. scooped, scoop·ing, scoops
1. To take up and often reposition with a scoop: scooped popcorn into a bag.
2. To hollow out by digging.
3. To pick up, gather, or collect swiftly and smoothly: scoop up a handful of jelly beans.
4. Informal To top or outmaneuver (a competitor) in acquiring and publishing an important news story.

[Middle English scope, from Middle Dutch and Middle Low German schōpe, bucket for bailing water.]

scoop′er n.
scoop′ful′ n.

scoop

(skuːp)
n
1. a utensil used as a shovel or ladle, esp a small shovel with deep sides and a short handle, used for taking up flour, corn, etc
2. a utensil with a long handle and round bowl used for dispensing liquids
3. (Cookery) a utensil with a round bowl and short handle, sometimes with a mechanical device to empty the bowl, for serving ice cream or mashed potato
4. (Tools) anything that resembles a scoop in action, such as the bucket on a dredge
5. (Surgery) a spoonlike surgical instrument for scraping or extracting foreign matter, etc, from the body
6. the quantity taken up by a scoop
7. the act of scooping, dredging, etc
8. a hollow cavity
9. slang a large quick gain, as of money
10. (Journalism & Publishing) a news story reported in one newspaper before all the others; an exclusive
11. (Journalism & Publishing) any sensational piece of news
vb (mainly tr)
12. (often foll by up) to take up and remove (an object or substance) with or as if with a scoop
13. (often foll by out) to hollow out with or as if with a scoop: to scoop a hole in a hillside.
14. to win (a prize, award, or large amount of money)
15. (Journalism & Publishing) to beat (rival newspapers) in uncovering a news item
16. (General Sporting Terms) sport to hit (the ball) on its underside so that it rises into the air
[C14: via Middle Dutch schōpe from Germanic; compare Old High German scephan to ladle, German schöpfen, Schaufel shovel, Dutch schoep vessel for baling]
ˈscooper n
ˈscoopˌful n

scoop

(skup)

n.
1. a ladle or ladlelike utensil, esp. a small shovel with a short handle, for taking up flour, sugar, etc.
2. a utensil composed of a bowl attached to a handle, for dishing out ice cream or other soft foods.
3. the bucket of a dredge, steam shovel, etc.
4. the quantity held or taken up in a scoop.
5. a hollow or hollowed-out place.
6. the act of scooping; a scooping movement.
7. a news item revealed in one newspaper, newscast, etc., before all others.
8. Informal. current information; news: What's the scoop on the new chairman?
9. Informal. a big haul, as of money.
v.t.
10. to take up or out with or as if with a scoop.
11. to empty with a scoop.
12. to form a hollow or hollows in.
13. to form with or as if with a scoop.
14. to pick up or gather by a sweeping motion of one's arms or hands (often fol. by up).
15. to reveal a news item before (one's competitors).
[1300–50; (n.) Middle English scope < Middle Dutch schōpe; (v.) Middle English scopen, derivative of the n.]
scoop′er, n.

Scoop

 an amount of some items obtained in a large quantity, as with a scoop; a piece of luck; an exclusive newspaper story.
Example: scoop of penance, 1440.

scoop


Past participle: scooped
Gerund: scooping

Imperative
scoop
scoop
Present
I scoop
you scoop
he/she/it scoops
we scoop
you scoop
they scoop
Preterite
I scooped
you scooped
he/she/it scooped
we scooped
you scooped
they scooped
Present Continuous
I am scooping
you are scooping
he/she/it is scooping
we are scooping
you are scooping
they are scooping
Present Perfect
I have scooped
you have scooped
he/she/it has scooped
we have scooped
you have scooped
they have scooped
Past Continuous
I was scooping
you were scooping
he/she/it was scooping
we were scooping
you were scooping
they were scooping
Past Perfect
I had scooped
you had scooped
he/she/it had scooped
we had scooped
you had scooped
they had scooped
Future
I will scoop
you will scoop
he/she/it will scoop
we will scoop
you will scoop
they will scoop
Future Perfect
I will have scooped
you will have scooped
he/she/it will have scooped
we will have scooped
you will have scooped
they will have scooped
Future Continuous
I will be scooping
you will be scooping
he/she/it will be scooping
we will be scooping
you will be scooping
they will be scooping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been scooping
you have been scooping
he/she/it has been scooping
we have been scooping
you have been scooping
they have been scooping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been scooping
you will have been scooping
he/she/it will have been scooping
we will have been scooping
you will have been scooping
they will have been scooping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been scooping
you had been scooping
he/she/it had been scooping
we had been scooping
you had been scooping
they had been scooping
Conditional
I would scoop
you would scoop
he/she/it would scoop
we would scoop
you would scoop
they would scoop
Past Conditional
I would have scooped
you would have scooped
he/she/it would have scooped
we would have scooped
you would have scooped
they would have scooped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scoop - the quantity a scoop will holdscoop - the quantity a scoop will hold  
containerful - the quantity that a container will hold
2.scoop - a hollow concave shape made by removing something
concave shape, concavity, incurvation, incurvature - a shape that curves or bends inward
3.scoop - a news report that is reported first by one news organization; "he got a scoop on the bribery of city officials"
news report, write up, account, report, story - a short account of the news; "the report of his speech"; "the story was on the 11 o'clock news"; "the account of his speech that was given on the evening news made the governor furious"
4.scoop - street names for gamma hydroxybutyratescoop - street names for gamma hydroxybutyrate
gamma hydroxybutyrate, GHB - a club drug available in liquid or powder form is taken orally (frequently combined with alcohol); used to incapacitate individuals for the commission of sexual assault and rape
5.scoop - the shovel or bucket of a dredge or backhoescoop - the shovel or bucket of a dredge or backhoe
backhoe - an excavator whose shovel bucket is attached to a hinged boom and is drawn backward to move earth
dredge - a power shovel to remove material from a channel or riverbed
shovel - a hand tool for lifting loose material; consists of a curved container or scoop and a handle
6.scoop - a large ladle; "he used a scoop to serve the ice cream"
ladle - a spoon-shaped vessel with a long handle; frequently used to transfer liquids from one container to another
Verb1.scoop - take out or up with or as if with a scoop; "scoop the sugar out of the container"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
dip - scoop up by plunging one's hand or a ladle below the surface; "dip water out of a container"
2.scoop - get the better ofscoop - get the better of; "the goal was to best the competition"
beat, beat out, vanquish, trounce, crush, shell - come out better in a competition, race, or conflict; "Agassi beat Becker in the tennis championship"; "We beat the competition"; "Harvard defeated Yale in the last football game"
outmaneuver, outmanoeuvre, outsmart - defeat by more skillful maneuvering; "The English troops outmaneuvered the Germans"; "My new supervisor knows how to outmaneuver the boss in most situations"

scoop

verb
1. win, get, receive, land, gain, achieve, net, earn, pick up, bag (informal), secure, collect, obtain, procure, come away with films which scooped awards around the world
noun
1. ladle, bailer, spoon, dipper a small ice-cream scoop
2. spoonful, lump, dollop (informal), ball, ladleful She gave him an extra scoop of clotted cream.
3. exclusive, exposé, coup, revelation, sensation, inside story one of the biggest scoops in the history of newspapers
scoop something or someone up gather up, lift, pick up, take up, sweep up or away He began to scoop his things up frantically. I wanted to scoop him up in my arms and give him a hug.
scoop something out
1. take out, empty, dig out, scrape out, spoon out, bail or bale out Cut a marrow in half and scoop out the seeds.
2. dig, shovel, excavate, gouge, hollow out A hole had been scooped out next to the house.

scoop

noun
Informal. New information, especially about recent events and happenings:
advice (often used in plural), intelligence, news, tiding (often used in plural), word.
verb
1. To break, turn over, or remove (earth or sand, for example) with or as if with a tool:
2. To take a substance, as liquid, from a container by plunging the hand or a utensil into it.Also used with up:
3. To make by digging:
Translations
سَبْقٌ صَحَفيمِجْرَفَه، مِعْزَقَهمِلْء المِجْرَفَهيَجْرُف، يَغْرُف
lžícenaběračkanaběráksbíratsólokapr
feje sammenscoopsensation
ilma-aukkokaapiakauhakauhallinenkauhoa
elsõnek leközölt szenzációmerítőkanál
ausa, skeiî, skóflabirting fréttar á undan keppinautumtína
samtelissensacinga žiniasusemti
grabienslāpstiņaliekšķerenemienssagrābt
výhradná správaza naberačku
ekskluzivna reportažalopaticanabrati z zajemalkozajemalka
alıp koymakatlatma haberkepçekepçe ile almak

scoop

[skuːp]
A. N
1. (for flour) → pala f; (for ice cream, water) → cucharón m; (= quantity scooped) → palada f, cucharada f
2. (by newspaper) → exclusiva f (Comm) → golpe m financiero, pelotazo m
to make a scoop (Press) → dar una exclusiva (Comm) → ganar un dineral de golpe y porrazo, dar el pelotazo
it was a scoop for the paperfue un gran éxito para el periódico
we brought off the scooplogramos un triunfo con la exclusiva
B. VT
1. (= pick up) → recoger
2. (Comm) [+ profit] → sacar (Comm, Press) [+ competitors] → adelantarse a (Press) [+ exclusive story] → publicar en exclusiva
we scooped the other papersquedamos por encima de los demás periódicos con nuestra exclusiva
3. [+ prize, award] → hacerse con, obtener
scoop out VT + ADV (with scoop) → sacar con pala; (with spoon) → sacar con cuchara; [+ water] → achicar; [+ hollow] → excavar, ahuecar
scoop up VT + ADVrecoger

scoop

[ˈskuːp]
n
(= utensil) (for flour, sugar, rice)pelle f; (for mashed potato)louche f; (for ice cream)cuiller f à glace; (for measuring coffee)mesure f
(= amount scooped) [flour, sugar, rice, mashed potatoes] → mesure f; [mashed potato] → louche f; [ice cream] → boule f
(for bailing water)écope f
(by the media)scoop m
vt
(= move with scooping motion)
He scooped her into his arms → Il la cueillit dans ses bras.
He scooped the ball over the defender's head → Il fit une louche qui loba le défenseur.
(= move with utensil)
She scooped ice into the ice bucket → Elle mit quelques pelletées de glaçons dans le seau à glace.
He scooped the dog food out of the can → Il retira à la cuiller la nourriture pour chien de la boîte.
(PRESS) [+ rival newspaper] → doubler (avec un scoop)
[+ prize, award] → rafler
scoop out
vt sepévider, creuser
scoop up
vt sep [+ clothes, objects] → ramasser
I scooped my son up in my arms → Je cueillis mon fils dans mes brasscoop neck
ncol m en U
modif [top, vest, T-shirt] → à col en U

scoop

n
(= instrument)Schaufel f; (for ice cream, potatoes etc) → Portionierer m; (= ball of ice cream, potato)Kugel f; in one scoop (lit, fig)auf einmal
(inf: = lucky gain) → Fang m (inf)
(Press) → Knüller m (inf), → Scoop m (sl); have you heard the latest scoop?weißt du schon das Neueste?
vt
(with scoop) → schaufeln; liquidschöpfen
The Times scooped the other papersdie Times ist den anderen Zeitungen zuvorgekommen
prize, jackpot, awardgewinnen

scoop

:
scoop neck
nU-Ausschnitt m
scoop-necked
adjmit U-Ausschnitt

scoop

[skuːp]
1. n
a. (for flour) → paletta; (for ice cream) → cucchiaio dosatore; (for water) → mestolo, ramaiolo
b. (also scoopful) → palettata, cucchiaiata, mestolata
three scoops of ice-cream → tre palline di gelato
c. (Press) → scoop m inv, colpo giornalistico (Comm) → affarone m
2. vt (Comm) (market) → accaparrarsi; (profit) → intascare (Comm, Press) (competitors) → battere sul tempo (Press) to scoop an exclusive (about)accaparrarsi l'esclusiva (su)
scoop out vt + adv (flour, water) → svuotare (con paletta, cucchiaio); (hole) → scavare
scoop up vt + adv (child) → sollevare (tra le braccia); (books) → raccogliere

scoop

(skuːp) noun
1. any of several types of spoon-like tool, used for lifting, serving etc. a grain scoop; an ice-cream scoop.
2. (also scoopful) the amount held in a scoop. a scoop of ice-cream; a scoopful of grain.
3. a piece of news etc that one newspaper gets and prints before the others. The reporter was sure that he had a scoop for his paper.
verb
to move with, or as if with, a scoop. He scooped the crumbs together with his fingers.

scoop

n. paletada, cucharada.
References in classic literature ?
And they gave me no end of points about how to scout for giants, and how to scoop them in; and they told me all sorts of charms against en- chantments, and gave me salves and other rubbish to put on my wounds.
One time Tom sent a boy to run about town with a blazing stick, which he called a slogan (which was the sign for the Gang to get together), and then he said he had got secret news by his spies that next day a whole parcel of Spanish merchants and rich A-rabs was going to camp in Cave Hollow with two hundred elephants, and six hundred camels, and over a thousand "sumter" mules, all loaded down with di'monds, and they didn't have only a guard of four hundred soldiers, and so we would lay in ambuscade, as he called it, and kill the lot and scoop the things.
sighed Miss Murdstone, giving me the tea-caddy scoop instead of her fingers.
Under a tuft of shade that on a green Stood whispering soft, by a fresh Fountain side They sat them down, and after no more toil Of thir sweet Gardning labour then suffic'd To recommend coole ZEPHYR, and made ease More easie, wholsom thirst and appetite More grateful, to thir Supper Fruits they fell, Nectarine Fruits which the compliant boughes Yeilded them, side-long as they sat recline On the soft downie Bank damaskt with flours: The savourie pulp they chew, and in the rinde Still as they thirsted scoop the brimming stream; Nor gentle purpose, nor endearing smiles Wanted, nor youthful dalliance as beseems Fair couple, linkt in happie nuptial League, Alone as they.
A sudden scoop of Max's wet warm tongue in her right ear startled her into activity.
That is not his biggest scoop," said Morcerf; "did he not make a million in Spaniards this last year?
Manicamp began to scoop up his gold by handfuls, and pour it in cascades upon his bed.
As they pass through this narrow strait, the Indians, standing on the rocks, or on the end of wooden stages projecting from the banks, scoop them up with small nets distended on hoops and attached to long handles, and cast them on the shore.
He would leave Bill in the barn to shovel the manure into the litter-carrier--a good fifteen-minute job; he would return in half an hour to find him sitting in the alleyway, staring down into his idle scoop.
Jo makes a scoop with one hand, which is supposed to be a bow.
They saw them lay their yellow burdens in it and scoop the overturned earth back over the tops of the ingots.
It was, after all, something of a scoop, for not one of the other passengers had been found who was in a position to say anything at all about him.