scope


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scope 1

 (skōp)
n.
1. The range of one's perceptions, thoughts, or actions: broaden one's scope by reading.
2. The opportunity or possibility to function or be active: gave her imagination broad scope. See Synonyms at room.
3. The extent of a given activity or subject that is involved, treated, or relevant: the scope of the debate. See Synonyms at range.
4. The length or sweep of a mooring cable.
5. Linguistics The range over a part of a sentence or discourse that a quantifier has an effect on.

[Italian scopo, aim, purpose, from Greek skopos, target, aim; see spek- in Indo-European roots.]

scope 2

(skōp)
n. Informal
A viewing instrument such as a periscope, microscope, or telescope.
tr.v. scoped, scop·ing, scopes
1. To examine or investigate, especially visually: scoped the landscape for signs of wildlife.
2. To examine using an optical instrument such as a telescope or an endoscope: scoped the stars around Orion; scoped the patient's esophagus.
Phrasal Verb:
scope out
1. To make a preliminary inspection or investigation of: "That summer ... she'd scoped out a big estate auction in Bennington and spotted a beautiful burnt-umber and deep-blue Chinese rug" (Janna Malamud Smith).
2. To seek by inspecting various possibilities: "Some of the islanders are expert fishing guides, eagerly showing up at the airport for the weekly flight from Honolulu to scope out clients" (Paul Theroux).

[From -scope (as in microscope periscope, etc.). Verb, probably from noun (perhaps influenced by scope).]

scope

(skəʊp)
n
1. opportunity for exercising the faculties or abilities; capacity for action: plenty of scope for improvement.
2. range of view, perception, or grasp; outlook
3. the area covered by an activity, topic, etc; range: the scope of his thesis was vast.
4. (Nautical Terms) nautical slack left in an anchor cable
5. (Logic) logic linguistics that part of an expression that is governed by a given operator: the scope of the negation in PV–(qr) is –(qr)
6. informal short for telescope, microscope, oscilloscope
7. archaic purpose or aim
vb (tr)
informal to look at or examine carefully
[C16: from Italian scopo goal, from Latin scopus, from Greek skopos target; related to Greek skopein to watch]

scope

(skoʊp)

n., v. scoped, scop•ing. n.
1. extent or range of view, outlook, application, operation, effectiveness, etc.: an investigation of wide scope.
2. opportunity or freedom for movement or activity: to give one's fancy full scope.
3. extent in space; a tract or area.
4. length: a scope of cable.
5. (used as a short form of microscope, periscope, radarscope, etc.)
6. Ling., Logic. the range of words or elements of an expression over which a modifier or operator has control: In “old men and women,” “old” may either take “men and women” or just “men” in its scope.
7. aim or purpose.
v.t.
8. Slang. to look at or over; examine (often fol. by out).
[1525–35; < Italian scopo < Greek skopós aim, mark to shoot at; compare -scope]

-scope

a combining form meaning “instrument for viewing”: telescope.
[< New Latin -scopium < Greek -skopion, -skopeion, derivative of skopeîn to look at (akin to sképtesthai to look, view carefully; compare skeptic)]

scope

- First meant "target for shooting," from Greek skopos, "target."
See also related terms for shooting.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scope - an area in which something acts or operates or has power or control: "the range of a supersonic jet"scope - an area in which something acts or operates or has power or control: "the range of a supersonic jet"; "a piano has a greater range than the human voice"; "the ambit of municipal legislation"; "within the compass of this article"; "within the scope of an investigation"; "outside the reach of the law"; "in the political orbit of a world power"
extent - the distance or area or volume over which something extends; "the vast extent of the desert"; "an orchard of considerable extent"
approximate range, ballpark - near to the scope or range of something; "his answer wasn't even in the right ballpark"
confines - a bounded scope; "he stayed within the confines of the city"
contrast - the range of optical density and tone on a photographic negative or print (or the extent to which adjacent areas on a television screen differ in brightness)
internationality, internationalism - quality of being international in scope; "he applauded the internationality of scientific terminology"
latitude - scope for freedom of e.g. action or thought; freedom from restriction
purview, horizon, view - the range of interest or activity that can be anticipated; "It is beyond the horizon of present knowledge"
expanse, sweep - a wide scope; "the sweep of the plains"
gamut - a complete extent or range: "a face that expressed a gamut of emotions"
spectrum - a broad range of related objects or values or qualities or ideas or activities
palette, pallet - the range of colour characteristic of a particular artist or painting or school of art
2.scope - the state of the environment in which a situation exists; "you can't do that in a university setting"
environment - the totality of surrounding conditions; "he longed for the comfortable environment of his living room"
canvass, canvas - the setting for a narrative or fictional or dramatic account; "the crowded canvas of history"; "the movie demanded a dramatic canvas of sound"
show window, showcase - a setting in which something can be displayed to best effect; "it was a showcase for democracy in Africa"
3.scope - a magnifier of images of distant objectsscope - a magnifier of images of distant objects
aperture - a device that controls amount of light admitted
astronomical telescope - any telescope designed to collect and record electromagnetic radiation from cosmic sources
collimator - a small telescope attached to a large telescope to use in setting the line of the larger one
equatorial - a telescope whose mounting has only two axes of motion, one parallel to the Earth's axis and the other one at right angles to it
view finder, viewfinder, finder - optical device that helps a user to find the target of interest
magnifier - a scientific instrument that magnifies an image
optical prism, prism - optical device having a triangular shape and made of glass or quartz; used to deviate a beam or invert an image
solar telescope - a telescope designed to make observations of the sun
transit instrument - a telescope mounted on an axis running east and west and used to time the transit of a celestial body across the meridian
4.scope - electronic equipment that provides visual images of varying electrical quantitiesscope - electronic equipment that provides visual images of varying electrical quantities
cardiac monitor, heart monitor - a piece of electronic equipment for continual observation of the function of the heart
cathode-ray tube, CRT - a vacuum tube in which a hot cathode emits a beam of electrons that pass through a high voltage anode and are focused or deflected before hitting a phosphorescent screen
electronic equipment - equipment that involves the controlled conduction of electrons (especially in a gas or vacuum or semiconductor)
monitoring device, monitor - display produced by a device that takes signals and displays them on a television screen or a computer monitor
microwave radar, radar, radio detection and ranging, radiolocation - measuring instrument in which the echo of a pulse of microwave radiation is used to detect and locate distant objects

scope

noun
1. opportunity, room, freedom, play, chance, space, possibility, liberty, latitude, elbowroom, leeway He believed in giving his staff scope for initiative.
2. range, capacity, reach, area, extent, confines, outlook, orbit, span, sphere, compass, remit, terms of reference, ambit, purview, field of reference the scope of a novel

scope

noun
1. The extent of one's perception, understanding, knowledge, or vision:
2. The ability or power to seize or attain:
3. Suitable opportunity to accept or allow something:
4. An area within which something or someone exists, acts, or has influence or power:
Translations
فُرْصَه، مَجالمَجال، مدى ، نِطاق
možnostsféra
pladsrækkevidde
svigrúmsviî
iespējalaukslokssfēra
sféra

scope

[skəʊp] N (= opportunity) (for action etc) → libertad f, oportunidades fpl; (= range) [of law, activity] → ámbito m; [of responsibilities] → ámbito m; (= capacity) [of person, mind] → alcance m; (= room) (for manoeuvre etc) → esfera f de acción, campo m de acción
a programme of considerable scopeun programa de gran alcance
the scope of the new measures must be definedconviene delimitar el campo de aplicación de las nuevas medidas
it is beyond her scopeestá fuera de su alcance
it is beyond the scope of this bookestá fuera del ámbito del presente libro
to extend the scope of one's activitiesampliar su campo de actividades
there is plenty of scope forhay bastante campo para
this should give you plenty of scope for your talentsesto ha de darte grandes posibilidades para explotar tus talentos
to give sb full scopedar carta blanca a algn
I'm looking for a job with more scopebusco un puesto que ofrezca más posibilidades
it is outside my scopeeso está fuera de mi alcance
it is within her scopeestá a su alcance
it is within the scope of this bookestá dentro del ámbito del presente libro

scope

[ˈskəʊp] n
(= opportunity) → place f
scope for sth
There is not much scope for originality → Il n'y a guère de place pour l'originalité.
There is plenty of scope for improvement → Il y a largement place pour une amélioration.
BUT Cela pourrait être beaucoup mieux.
(= range) [plan, undertaking, investigation, article] → portée f
within the scope of [+ directive, law, bill, inquiry] → dans le cadre de
(= capacity) [person] → envergure f

scope

n
(of topic, idea, investigation)Umfang m; (of law, measures)Reichweite f; (of sb’s duties, department, tribunal)Kompetenzbereich m; something is within the scope of somethingetw hält sich or bleibt im Rahmen einer Sache (gen); something is within the scope of a department etcetw fällt in den Kompetenzbereich einer Abteilung etc; something is beyond or outside the scope of somethingetw geht über etw (acc)hinaus; that’s beyond the scope of this departmentdas geht über den Kompetenzbereich dieser Abteilung hinaus; it’s not within the scope of my authority to allow thates würde meine Kompetenzen überschreiten, dies zu erlauben; this project is more limited in scopedieses Projekt ist auf einen engeren Rahmen begrenzt; to be broad in scopebreit angelegt sein
(= extent of one’s perception, grasp)Fassungsvermögen nt; (of talents, knowledge)Umfang m; that job would be beyond my scopediese Arbeit würde meine Fähigkeiten übersteigen; that is beyond my scope or the scope of my understandingdas übersteigt mein Fassungsvermögen; that job is within his scopediese Arbeit liegt im Bereich seiner Fähigkeiten
(= opportunity)Möglichkeit(en) f(pl); (to develop one’s talents) → Entfaltungsmöglichkeit f; (to use one’s talents) → Spielraum m; there is scope for improvementes könnte noch verbessert werden; there is scope for further growth in the tourist industrydie Tourismusindustrie ist noch ausbaufähig or hat noch Entwicklungsmöglichkeiten; there is little scope for originalityes gibt wenig Spielraum für Originalität; there is little scope for reducing our costses gibt wenig Spielraum, um die Kosten zu senken; to give somebody scope to do somethingjdm den nötigen Spielraum geben, etw zu tun; the job gave him/his imaginative powers full scopein diesem Beruf konnten sich seine Fähigkeiten/konnte sich seine Fantasie or Phantasie frei entfalten
(inf) = microscope, periscopeetc

scope

[skəʊp] n (opportunity, for action) → possibilità fpl; (range, of law, activity) → ambito; (capacity, of person) → capacità fpl; (of plan, undertaking) → portata
it's beyond the scope of a child's mind → è al di sopra delle capacità di un bambino
it's well within his scope to ... → è perfettamente in grado di...
there is plenty of scope for improvement (Brit) → ci sono notevoli possibilità di miglioramento
it is within/beyond the scope of this book → rientra/non rientra nei limiti di questo libro

scope

(skəup) noun
1. (often with for) the opportunity or chance to do, use or develop. There's no scope for originality in this job.
2. the area or extent of an activity etc. Few things are beyond the scope of a child's imagination.
References in classic literature ?
Browning with tact, with a real refinement and grace; saying well many [42] things which every competent reader of the great poet must feel to be true; devoting to the subject he loves a critical gift so considerable as to make us wish for work from his hands of larger scope than this small volume.
If the irrational cannot be excluded, it should be outside the scope of the tragedy.
I see a force producing effects beyond the scope of ordinary human agencies; I do not understand why this occurs and I talk of genius.
In spite of all that has happened since, I still remember that vigil very distinctly: the black and silent observatory, the shadowed lantern throwing a feeble glow upon the floor in the corner, the steady ticking of the clockwork of the tele- scope, the little slit in the roof--an oblong profundity with the stardust streaked across it.
The storm which was coming was already making itself manifest, not only in the wide scope of nature, but in the hearts and natures of human beings.
They may prefer a system which would give unlimited scope to all nations to be the carriers as well as the purchasers of their commodities.
The many books he had read filled his mind with ideas which, because he only half understood them, gave more scope to his imagination.
Thus doth the master give free scope to his slaves, and even enjoyeth their presumptuousness.
The scope of the Library thus became extended into something more international, and it is entering on the fifth decade of its existence in the hope that it may contribute to that mutual understanding between countries which is so pressing a need of the present time.
But there is so little scope for the imagination in an asylum--only just in the other orphans.
So that no man can be secret, except he give himself a little scope of dissimulation; which is, as it were, but the skirts or train of secrecy.
This was the effect with me of all the criticism which I had hitherto read, and I am not sure yet that the criticism which tries to be of a larger scope, and to see things "whole," is of any definite effect.