scorned


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scorn

 (skôrn)
n.
1.
a. Contempt or disdain felt toward a person or object considered despicable or unworthy: viewed his rivals with scorn.
b. The expression of such an attitude in behavior or speech; derision: heaped scorn upon his rivals.
c. The state of being despised or dishonored: held in scorn by his rivals.
2. Archaic One spoken of or treated with contempt.
tr.v. scorned, scorn·ing, scorns
1. To consider or treat as contemptible or unworthy: an artist who was scorned by conservative critics.
2. To reject or refuse with derision: scorned their offer of help. See Synonyms at despise.
3. To consider or reject (doing something) as beneath one's dignity: "She disapproved so heartily of Flora's plan that she would have scorned to assist in the concoction of a single oily sentence" (Stella Gibbons).

[Middle English, from Old French escarn, of Germanic origin.]

scorn′er n.
scorn′ful adj.
scorn′ful·ly adv.
scorn′ful·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.scorned - treated with contempt
unloved - not loved
References in classic literature ?
You know your castle wouldn't be perfect without," said blunt Jo, who had no tender fancies yet, and rather scorned romance, except in books.
The novice in the military art flew from point to point, retarding his own preparations by the excess of his violent and somewhat distempered zeal; while the more practiced veteran made his arrangements with a deliberation that scorned every appearance of haste; though his sober lineaments and anxious eye sufficiently betrayed that he had no very strong professional relish for the, as yet, untried and dreaded warfare of the wilderness.
All this, with the quaint gorgeousness of the old china cups and saucers, and the crested spoons, and a silver cream-jug (Hepzibah's only other article of plate, and shaped like the rudest porringer), set out a board at which the stateliest of old Colonel Pyncheon's guests need not have scorned to take his place.
Such occasions might remind the elderly citizen of that period, before the last war with England, when Salem was a port by itself; not scorned, as she is now, by her own merchants and ship-owners, who permit her wharves to crumble to ruin while their ventures go to swell, needlessly and imperceptibly, the mighty flood of commerce at New York or Boston.
Some people would have scorned this talk as gossip; but then one has to talk about what one knows.
People who did nothing, or who did not know exactly what they were going to do, or who did not take the most direct way to accomplish what they set their hands to, were objects of her entire contempt,--a contempt shown less frequently by anything she said, than by a kind of stony grimness, as if she scorned to say anything about the matter.
There had been a time when he would have scorned her as a companion, and turned from her with little ceremony.
Rochester: I could not unlove him now, merely because I found that he had ceased to notice me--because I might pass hours in his presence, and he would never once turn his eyes in my direction--because I saw all his attentions appropriated by a great lady, who scorned to touch me with the hem of her robes as she passed; who, if ever her dark and imperious eye fell on me by chance, would withdraw it instantly as from an object too mean to merit observation.
she would have scorned to do it, if she had been spitted on the horns of a mad cow.
Try as hard as they might, the servants could never succeed in persuading him that he was drunk; he always scorned the imputation.
I only know that we are minded to be rid of Nada, and thus to be avenged on a man who has scorned our love--ay, and on those men who follow after the beauty of Nada.
All the same he would have scorned to look at or touch one of his wounds.