scornful


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scorn

 (skôrn)
n.
1.
a. Contempt or disdain felt toward a person or object considered despicable or unworthy: viewed his rivals with scorn.
b. The expression of such an attitude in behavior or speech; derision: heaped scorn upon his rivals.
c. The state of being despised or dishonored: held in scorn by his rivals.
2. Archaic One spoken of or treated with contempt.
tr.v. scorned, scorn·ing, scorns
1. To consider or treat as contemptible or unworthy: an artist who was scorned by conservative critics.
2. To reject or refuse with derision: scorned their offer of help. See Synonyms at despise.
3. To consider or reject (doing something) as beneath one's dignity: "She disapproved so heartily of Flora's plan that she would have scorned to assist in the concoction of a single oily sentence" (Stella Gibbons).

[Middle English, from Old French escarn, of Germanic origin.]

scorn′er n.
scorn′ful adj.
scorn′ful·ly adv.
scorn′ful·ness n.

scorn•ful

(ˈskɔrn fəl)

adj.
full of scorn; derisive; contemptuous.
[1350–1400]
scorn′ful•ly, adv.
scorn′ful•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.scornful - expressing extreme contempt
disrespectful - exhibiting lack of respect; rude and discourteous; "remarks disrespectful of the law"; "disrespectful in the presence of his parents"; "disrespectful toward his teacher"

scornful

scornful

adjective
Showing scorn and disrespect toward (someone or something):
Translations
مُحْتَقِر، مُزْدَرٍمُظْهِرٌ للإحْتِقار، مُسْتَخِف
pohrdavýopovržlivý
hånendehånlig
fitymáló
fullur fyrirlitningarfyrirlitningar-
pogardliwy
prezirljiv
hakaret doluküçümseyen

scornful

[ˈskɔːnfʊl] ADJdesdeñoso, despreciativo
to be scornful about sthdesdeñar algo

scornful

[ˈskɔːrnfəl] adjméprisant(e)

scornful

adjverächtlich; laughter also, personspöttisch, höhnisch; to be scornful of somebody/somethingjdn/etw verachten; (verbally) → jdn/etw verhöhnen; to be scornful about somebody/somethingsich über jdn/etw verächtlich äußern

scornful

[ˈskɔːnfʊl] adjsprezzante
to be scornful about sth → parlare con disprezzo di qc

scorn

(skoːn) noun
contempt or disgust. He looked at my drawing with scorn.
verb
to show contempt for; to despise. They scorned my suggestion.
ˈscornful adjective
1. feeling or showing scorn. a scornful expression/remark.
2. making scornful remarks. He was rather scornful about your book.
ˈscornfully adverb
ˈscornfulness noun
References in classic literature ?
Leo, in a low voice, tossed off some scornful remark in Bohemian.
Who will dare meet the mother of Wassawattimie, that scornful woman, with his hands clean
Of an impulsive and passionate nature, she had fortified herself to encounter the stings and venomous stabs of public contumely, wreaking itself in every variety of insult; but there was a quality so much more terrible in the solemn mood of the popular mind, that she longed rather to behold all those rigid countenances contorted with scornful merriment, and herself the object.
Starting at the unforeseen concluding exclamation of the so suddenly scornful old man, Stubb was speechless a moment; then said excitedly, I am not used to be spoken to that way, sir; I do but less than half like it, sir.
My lady put up her scornful lip and withdrew to one side; she said in their hearing that she would as soon think of eating with the other cattle -- a remark which embarrassed these poor devils merely be- cause it referred to them, and not because it insulted or offended them, for it didn't.
Roxy scorched him with a scornful gaze awhile, then she said:
Her heart was melted now, and she determined to win aunt Miranda's approval by some desperate means, and to try and forget the one thing that rankled worst, the scornful mention of her father, of whom she thought with the greatest admiration, and whom she had not yet heard criticised; for such sorrows and disappointments as Aurelia Randall had suffered had never been communicated to her children.
She had been often remiss, her conscience told her so; remiss, perhaps, more in thought than fact; scornful, ungracious.
Hindley lavished on her a torrent of scornful abuse, and bade her get to her room immediately, or she shouldn't cry for nothing
She condescended to make no reply, but, turning on me with another scornful laugh, said:
The other, with an effort at a scornful smile - which could not, however, collect the nervous working of his mouth into any set expression - looked at the soldiers, and looked about at the marshes and at the sky, but certainly did not look at the speaker.
The questionable sound of Silas's loom, so unlike the natural cheerful trotting of the winnowing-machine, or the simpler rhythm of the flail, had a half-fearful fascination for the Raveloe boys, who would often leave off their nutting or birds'-nesting to peep in at the window of the stone cottage, counterbalancing a certain awe at the mysterious action of the loom, by a pleasant sense of scornful superiority, drawn from the mockery of its alternating noises, along with the bent, tread-mill attitude of the weaver.