scraggy


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.

scrag·gy

 (skrăg′ē)
adj. scrag·gi·er, scrag·gi·est
1. Jagged; rough: scraggy cliffs.
2. Bony and lean: a scraggy cat.

scrag′gi·ly adv.
scrag′gi·ness n.

scraggy

(ˈskræɡɪ)
adj, -gier or -giest
1. lean or scrawny
2. rough; unkempt
ˈscraggily adv
ˈscragginess n

scrag•gy

(ˈskræg i)

adj. -gi•er, -gi•est.
1. lean or scrawny.
2. jagged.
[1565–75]
scrag′gi•ly, adv.
scrag′gi•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.scraggy - being very thin; "a child with skinny freckled legs"; "a long scrawny neck"
lean, thin - lacking excess flesh; "you can't be too rich or too thin"; "Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look"-Shakespeare
2.scraggy - having a sharply uneven surface or outline; "the jagged outline of the crags"; "scraggy cliffs"
uneven - not even or uniform as e.g. in shape or texture; "an uneven color"; "uneven ground"; "uneven margins"; "wood with an uneven grain"

scraggy

adjective
2. unkempt, scruffy, tousled, rough, grotty (slang), lank, draggletailed (archaic) Their hallmarks are scraggy hair and scruffy clothes.
Translations
رفيع بصورَةٍ غَيْر جَذّابَه
vyzáblý
mager
horaîur
perkaręs
kārnstievs
cılızçok zayıfsıska

scraggy

[ˈskrægɪ] ADJ (scraggier (compar) (scraggiest (superl))) → flacucho

scraggy

[ˈskrægi] adj [neck, person, sheep, bird] → décharné(e); [plant, tree] → décharné(e); [beard] → clairsemé(e)

scraggy

adj (+er)
(= scrawny)dürr; meatminderwertig, sehnig
(= unkempt, scanty) hairzottig, zerfranst; furzottig

scraggy

[ˈskrægɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (neck, limb) → scheletrico/a; (animal) → pelle e ossa inv

scraggy

(ˈskrӕgi) adjective
unattractively thin. a scraggy neck.
ˈscragginess noun
References in classic literature ?
how planted upon this once scraggy scoria of a country?
She forgot all fear of her father, went up to him, took his hand, and drawing him down put her arm round his thin, scraggy neck.
The child (a little boy, apparently about five years old) scrambled up to the top of the wall, and called again and again; but finding this of no avail, apparently made up his mind, like Mahomet, to go to the mountain, since the mountain would not come to him, and attempted to get over; but a crabbed old cherry-tree, that grew hard by, caught him by the frock in one of its crooked scraggy arms that stretched over the wall.
The soil was barren, scarcely affording pasture for a few miserable cows, and oatmeal for its inhabitants, which consisted of five persons, whose gaunt and scraggy limbs gave tokens of their miserable fare.
He is twenty years younger, but has something of the same spare, scraggy physique.
an infant of eighteen, and a scraggy nest of foreign office holders, sit in the places of Themistocles, Pericles, and the illustrious scholars and generals of the Golden Age of Greece.
His gray eyes were glancing under a pair of shaggy brows, that over hung them in long hairs of gray mingled with their natural hue; his scraggy neck was bare, and burnt to the same tint with his face; though a small part of a shirt-collar, made of the country check, was to be seen above the overdress he wore.
She raised up a panel which was leaning against the wall, and showed a rude painting of a scraggy and angular fowl, with very long legs and a spotted body.
Swishtail's academy upon what are called "mutual principles"--that is to say, the expenses of his board and schooling were defrayed by his father in goods, not money; and he stood there--most at the bottom of the school--in his scraggy corduroys and jacket, through the seams of which his great big bones were bursting--as the representative of so many pounds of tea, candles, sugar, mottled-soap, plums (of which a very mild proportion was supplied for the puddings of the establishment), and other commodities.
MacWhirr (a pretentious person with a scraggy neck and a disdainful manner) was admittedly ladylike, and in the neighbourhood considered as "quite superior.
Harraway, the secretary, was a lean, bitter man with a long, scraggy neck and nervous, jerky limbs, a man of incorruptible fidelity where the finances of the order were concerned, and with no notion of justice or honesty to anyone beyond.
There were white-tusked wild males, with fallen leaves and nuts and twigs lying in the wrinkles of their necks and the folds of their ears; fat, slow-footed she-elephants, with restless, little pinky black calves only three or four feet high running under their stomachs; young elephants with their tusks just beginning to show, and very proud of them; lanky, scraggy old-maid elephants, with their hollow anxious faces, and trunks like rough bark; savage old bull elephants, scarred from shoulder to flank with great weals and cuts of bygone fights, and the caked dirt of their solitary mud baths dropping from their shoulders; and there was one with a broken tusk and the marks of the full-stroke, the terrible drawing scrape, of a tiger's claws on his side.