screw propeller


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

screw propeller

n.
A propeller.

screw propeller

n
(Mechanical Engineering) an early form of ship's propeller in which an Archimedes' screw is used to produce thrust by accelerating a flow of water
ˈscrew-proˈpelled adj

pro•pel•ler

(prəˈpɛl ər)

n.
1. a device having a revolving hub with radiating blades, for propelling an airplane, ship, etc.
2. a person or thing that propels.
3. the bladed rotor of a pump that drives the fluid axially.
4. a wind-driven, usu. three-bladed device that provides mechanical energy, as for driving an electric alternator in wind plants.
[1770–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.screw propeller - a propeller with several angled blades that rotates to push against water or airscrew propeller - a propeller with several angled blades that rotates to push against water or air
outboard motor, outboard - internal-combustion engine that mounts at stern of small boat
propeller, propellor - a mechanical device that rotates to push against air or water
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
Translations
References in classic literature ?
She was a screw propeller of eight hundred tons, a fast sailer, and the very vessel that had been sent out to the polar regions, to revictual the last expedition of Sir James Ross.
Brunel built her from iron and the previously unheard of 1000 hp steam engine and screw propeller ensured Great Britain really did rule the waves.
the effect of the water flow produced by the screw propeller on the ship board.
Such reactions happen more intensively under the increased temperature or low pressure conditions that are common around a screw propeller.
They not only gave us the first golden lager in 1842, but introduced the world to the screw propeller (Josef Ressell in 1826), the gel contact lens (Otto Wichterle) and the arc lamp (Frantisek Krisik).
The principles underlying this kind of propulsion are different from those for a conventional screw propeller.
His revolutionary iron ship, Great Britain, of 1843, the first major ship powered by a screw propeller sailed from Liverpool to the US and carried a total of 15,000 emigrants to Australia.