screw up


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screw
left to right: round-head machine screw, flat-head wood screw, and round-head wood screw

screw

 (skro͞o)
n.
1.
a. A cylindrical rod incised with one or more helical or advancing spiral threads, as a lead screw or worm screw.
b. The tapped collar or socket that receives this rod.
2. A metal pin with incised threads and a broad slotted head that can be driven as a fastener by turning with a screwdriver, especially:
a. A tapered and pointed wood screw.
b. A cylindrical and flat-tipped machine screw.
3. A device having a helical form, such as a corkscrew.
4. A propeller.
5. A twist or turn, as of a screw.
6. Slang
a. A prison guard.
b. The turnkey of a jail.
7. Vulgar Slang The act or an instance of having sexual intercourse.
8. Chiefly British Slang
a. Salary; wages.
b. A small paper packet, as of tobacco.
c. An old broken-down horse.
d. A stingy or crafty bargainer.
v. screwed, screw·ing, screws
v.tr.
1. To drive or tighten (a screw).
2.
a. To fasten, tighten, or attach by means of a screw or similar fastener.
b. To attach (a tapped or threaded fitting or cap) by twisting into place.
c. To rotate (a part) on a threaded axis.
3. To contort (one's face).
4. Slang
To treat (someone) unfairly; exploit or cheat: screwed me out of the most lucrative sales territory.
5. Vulgar Slang To have sexual intercourse with.
v.intr.
1. To turn or twist.
2.
a. To become attached by means of the threads of a screw.
b. To be capable of such attachment.
3. Vulgar Slang To have sexual intercourse.
Phrasal Verbs:
screw around
1. Slang To act or fool around aimlessly or in a confused way and accomplish nothing.
2. Vulgar Slang To be sexually promiscuous.
screw over
Slang To treat (someone) unfairly.
screw up
1. To muster or summon up: screwed up my courage.
2. Slang To make a mess of (an undertaking).
3. Slang To injure or damage: Lifting those boxes really screwed up my back. That decision screwed up my career.
4. Slang To cause (someone) to be emotionally or mentally troubled: His father's harshness really screwed him up.
Idiom:
have a screw loose Slang
To behave in an eccentric or mentally deranged manner.

[Middle English skrewe, from Old French escrove, female screw, nut, perhaps from Medieval Latin scrōfa, from Latin, sow; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

screw′a·ble adj.
screw′er n.

screw up

vb (tr, adverb)
1. to twist out of shape or distort
2. to summon up or call upon: to screw up one's courage.
3. (also intr) informal to mishandle or make a mess (of)
4. (often passive) informal to cause to become very anxious, confused, or nervous: he is really screwed up about his exams.
n
slang something mishandled or done badly
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.screw up - make more intense; "Emotions were screwed up"
compound, deepen, intensify, heighten - make more intense, stronger, or more marked; "The efforts were intensified", "Her rudeness intensified his dislike for her"; "Pot smokers claim it heightens their awareness"; "This event only deepened my convictions"
2.screw up - make a mess of, destroy or ruinscrew up - make a mess of, destroy or ruin; "I botched the dinner and we had to eat out"; "the pianist screwed up the difficult passage in the second movement"
go wrong, miscarry, fail - be unsuccessful; "Where do today's public schools fail?"; "The attempt to rescue the hostages failed miserably"
3.screw up - screw or turn higher
screw - turn like a screw
4.screw up - twist into a strained configuration; "screw up one's face"
grimace, make a face, pull a face - contort the face to indicate a certain mental or emotional state; "He grimaced when he saw the amount of homework he had to do"

screw up

verb
Slang. To harm irreparably through inept handling; make a mess:
Informal: bollix up, muck up.
Idiom: make a muck of.
Translations
يُجَعِّد، يَطْعَجيُشيعُ فَوْضىيُقَطِّبُ جبينَه، يَعْبِس
pokazitzkřivitzmačkatzpackat
forkludreforvrængekrølle sammen
elfintorít
krumpa, vöîla samansetja upp skeifu, gretta/krumpa
skrčiť
buruşturmakkırıştırmakyüzüne gözüne bulaştırmak

w>screw up

vt sep
screw, nutanziehen
(= crush) paper, materialzusammenknüllen, zerknüllen
eyeszusammenkneifen; faceverziehen; to screw up one’s courageseinen ganzen Mut zusammennehmen; to screw oneself up to do somethingsich aufraffen, etw zu tun
(inf: = spoil) → vermasseln (inf); he’s really screwed things uper hat da wirklich Scheiße gebaut (inf)
(inf: = make uptight) sbneurotisch machen; he’s so screwed upder hat einen Schaden (inf); to be screwed up about somethingsich wegen etw ganz verrückt machen; to get screwed up about somethingsich in etw (acc)hineinsteigern
vi (inf: = make a mess) → Scheiße bauen (inf)(on sth bei etw)

screw

(skruː) noun
1. a type of nail that is driven into something by a firm twisting action. I need four strong screws for fixing the cupboard to the wall.
2. an action of twisting a screw etc. He tightened it by giving it another screw.
verb
1. to fix, or be fixed, with a screw or screws. He screwed the handle to the door; The handle screws on with these screws.
2. to fix or remove, or be fixed or removed, with a twisting movement. Make sure that the hook is fully screwed in; He screwed off the lid.
3. (slang, vulgar) to fuck; to have sex (with).
4. (slang) to cheat or take advantage of. They screwed you – these are not real diamonds.
ˈscrewdriver noun
a kind of tool for turning screws.
be/get screwed
(slang) be cheated. You've been screwed – it's not worth more than $10.
have a screw loose
(of a person) to be a bit mad.
put the screws on
to use force or pressure in dealing with a person. If he won't give us the money, we'll have to put the screws on (him).
screw up
1. to twist or wrinkle (the face or features). The baby screwed up its face and began to cry.
2. to crumple. She screwed up the letter.
3. (slang) to bungle; to make a mess of. He screwed up again; Plan it carefully – I don't want you to screw things up.
screw up one's courage
to make oneself brave enough to do something. He screwed up his courage to ask her to marry him.
References in periodicals archive ?
Young people shouldn't grow up with the idea that if they screw up they can always go out on the stump and recoup their losses by telling heart-warming stories about their mistakes.
David Eddie writes that no one is perfect, and the difference between a perennial screw up and someone who isn't is how one responds to said screw ups.
Crossark1 said: "Some of these are obviously inserted after the fact, but I wouldn't say they're fake as much as screw ups fixed post production.