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scribe

 (skrīb)
n.
1. A public clerk or secretary, especially in ancient times.
2. A professional copyist of manuscripts and documents.
3. A writer or journalist.
4. See scriber.
v. scribed, scrib·ing, scribes
v.tr.
1. To mark with a scriber.
2. To write or inscribe.
v.intr.
To work as a scribe.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin scrība, from Latin, keeper of accounts, secretary, from scrībere, to write; see skrībh- in Indo-European roots.]

scrib′al adj.

scribe

(skraɪb)
n
1. a person who copies documents, esp a person who made handwritten copies before the invention of printing
2. a clerk or public copyist
3. (Judaism) Old Testament a recognized scholar and teacher of the Jewish Law
4. (Judaism) Judaism a man qualified to write certain documents in accordance with religious requirements
5. (Journalism & Publishing) an author or journalist: used humorously
6. (Tools) another name for scriber
vb
(Tools) to score a line on (a surface) with a pointed instrument, as in metalworking
[(in the senses: writer, etc) C14: from Latin scrība clerk, from scrībere to write; C17 (vb): perhaps from inscribe]
ˈscribal adj

Scribe

(French skrib)
n
(Biography) Augustin Eugène (oɡystɛ̃ øʒɛn). 1791–1861, French author or coauthor of over 350 vaudevilles, comedies, and libretti for light opera

scribe1

(skraɪb)

n., v. scribed, scrib•ing. n.
1. a professional copyist, esp. one who made copies of manuscripts before the invention of printing.
2. a public clerk or writer, esp. one with official status.
3. one of a group of Palestinian scholars and teachers of Jewish law and tradition, active from the 5th century B.C. to the 1st century A.D., who transcribed, edited, and interpreted the Bible.
4. a writer or author, esp. a journalist.
v.i.
5. to act as a scribe; write.
v.t.
6. to write down.
[1350–1400; < Latin scrība clerk, derivative of scrībere to write]
scrib′al, adj.

scribe2

(skraɪb)

v. scribed, scrib•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to mark or score (wood or the like) with a pointed instrument as a guide to cutting or assembling.
n.
2. scriber.
[1670–80; perhaps aph. form of inscribe]

scribe


Past participle: scribed
Gerund: scribing

Imperative
scribe
scribe
Present
I scribe
you scribe
he/she/it scribes
we scribe
you scribe
they scribe
Preterite
I scribed
you scribed
he/she/it scribed
we scribed
you scribed
they scribed
Present Continuous
I am scribing
you are scribing
he/she/it is scribing
we are scribing
you are scribing
they are scribing
Present Perfect
I have scribed
you have scribed
he/she/it has scribed
we have scribed
you have scribed
they have scribed
Past Continuous
I was scribing
you were scribing
he/she/it was scribing
we were scribing
you were scribing
they were scribing
Past Perfect
I had scribed
you had scribed
he/she/it had scribed
we had scribed
you had scribed
they had scribed
Future
I will scribe
you will scribe
he/she/it will scribe
we will scribe
you will scribe
they will scribe
Future Perfect
I will have scribed
you will have scribed
he/she/it will have scribed
we will have scribed
you will have scribed
they will have scribed
Future Continuous
I will be scribing
you will be scribing
he/she/it will be scribing
we will be scribing
you will be scribing
they will be scribing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been scribing
you have been scribing
he/she/it has been scribing
we have been scribing
you have been scribing
they have been scribing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been scribing
you will have been scribing
he/she/it will have been scribing
we will have been scribing
you will have been scribing
they will have been scribing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been scribing
you had been scribing
he/she/it had been scribing
we had been scribing
you had been scribing
they had been scribing
Conditional
I would scribe
you would scribe
he/she/it would scribe
we would scribe
you would scribe
they would scribe
Past Conditional
I would have scribed
you would have scribed
he/she/it would have scribed
we would have scribed
you would have scribed
they would have scribed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scribe - French playwright (1791-1861)
2.scribe - informal terms for journalists
journalist - a writer for newspapers and magazines
3.scribe - someone employed to make written copies of documents and manuscriptsscribe - someone employed to make written copies of documents and manuscripts
employee - a worker who is hired to perform a job
4.scribe - a sharp-pointed awl for marking wood or metal to be cutscribe - a sharp-pointed awl for marking wood or metal to be cut
awl - a pointed tool for marking surfaces or for punching small holes
Verb1.scribe - score a line on with a pointed instrument, as in metalworking
nock, score, mark - make small marks into the surface of; "score the clay before firing it"

scribe

noun
1. secretary, clerk, scrivener (archaic), notary (archaic), amanuensis, copyist a temple scribe
2. writer, copyist, penman (rare) another scribe had added the last words

scribe

verb
To form letters, characters, or words on a surface with an instrument:
Translations
pisař
kirjatakirjoittaalainoppinutpiirrinpiirrottaa

scribe

[skraɪb] N [of manuscript] → escribiente/a m/f (Bible) → escriba m

scribe

[ˈskraɪb] nscribe m

scribe

nSchreiber(in) m(f); (Bibl) → Schriftgelehrte(r) m

scribe

[skraɪb] nscriba m
References in periodicals archive ?
These generalizations were contradicted by the handful of scholars who have investigated the resiliency of Irish-language scribal culture, and I wanted to expand on that work by considering the broader culture of speakers of Irish more to consider the features of their history during this understudied time.
Jesus against the Scribal Elite: The Origins of the Conflict.
Bach's chorale harmonizations, scribal copies assume the status of primary sources.
Among the topics are the papyrus manuscripts, the Greek minuscules, the Greek lectionaries, the Diatessaron of Tatian, the Syriac versions, the Coptic versions, the Ethiopic version, the Armenian version, the Gothic version, the use of the Greek fathers for New Testament textual criticism, scribal tendencies in transmission, analyzing and categorizing New Testament Greek manuscripts, criteria for evaluating readings in textual criticism, modern critical edition and apparatuses of the Greek New Testament, and reasoned eclecticism in New Testament textual criticism.
Lawrence Earp turns to investigate scribal practice and manuscript production in the Machaut manuscripts.
It is doubtful that we have here a scribal confusion of the letters aleph and ayin since the Ketib-Qere apparatus attests only to the ayin-lamed/aleph-lamed confusion.
In postexilic times a library seems to have developed in Jerusalem, and the scribal culture dedicated itself to writing down the most important traditions of Israel.
Rio takes a different approach, bringing modern concerns with scribal activity, orality, and literacy to the fore with promising results.
In so doing, they illuminated three major themes: arithmetic exploiting a notation of numbers based entirely on two basic symbols; the scribal schools of Nippur, which was the most prestigious center of scribal education; and advanced mathematical training.
However, there are many instances of scribal intrusion where only a detailed analysis of the text itself, or even the comparison of different manuscripts, can lead us to the identification of a modified reading.