scriptorium


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scrip·to·ri·um

 (skrĭp-tôr′ē-əm)
n. pl. scrip·to·ri·ums or scrip·to·ri·a (-tôr′ē-ə)
A room in a monastery set aside for the copying, writing, or illuminating of manuscripts and records.

[Medieval Latin scrīptōrium, from Latin scrīptus, past participle of scrībere, to write; see skrībh- in Indo-European roots.]

scriptorium

(skrɪpˈtɔːrɪəm)
n, pl -riums or -ria (-rɪə)
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a room, esp in a monastery, set apart for the writing or copying of manuscripts
[from Medieval Latin]

scrip•to•ri•um

(skrɪpˈtɔr i əm, -ˈtoʊr-)

n., pl. -to•ri•ums, -to•ri•a (-ˈtɔr i ə, -ˈtoʊr-)
a room, as in a monastery, where manuscripts are stored, read, or copied.
[1765–75; < Medieval Latin scrīptōrium; see script]

scriptorium

a room in a monastery for the writing or copying of manuscripts.
See also: Manuscripts
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scriptorium - a room in a monastery that is set aside for writing or copying manuscripts
monastery - the residence of a religious community
room - an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"
Translations
Skriptorium
kirjoitushuonescriptorium
scriptorium

scriptorium

n pl <scriptoria> → Schreibstube f (eines Klosters)
References in periodicals archive ?
It used to take four monks, labouring in a scriptorium with quills over calfskin, up to a year to produce a single book.
Benedictine monks established libraries and a scriptorium.
When we examine these in detail we can see clear evidence that it was produced in a busy scriptorium.
Become a scribe in the scriptorium and as the Vikings invade see how life was for those captured by the Vikings as slaves.
But when the Scriptorium is broken into, and Ravine Guard Carnifex Thane sees a homunculus fleeing the scene of the crime, events are set in motion that will ensure nothing will ever be the same again.
We also see in this final room an earlier work, Jones' frontispiece for Gill's tract 'Christianity and Art', 1927; this small wood-engraving, known as The Artist can be read as a kind of self-portrait, and as a vision of the universal artist, imagined here in a setting which recalls a monastic scriptorium or portraits of the Evangelists.
At the time, the castle was used as a scriptorium, where friars wrote manuscripts, and was connected to the chapel by secret tunnels.
Readers get a behind-the-scenes tour of the creation of each volume, with a fascinating window into the activities, challenges, and struggles at Donald Jackson s Scriptorium in Wales.
These are important because, as Martyn argues convincingly, the style and care taken by this scribe or scribes link the manuscript with two other copies of Gregorys letters that we know were created in the tenth-century Fleury scriptorium.
V I watched you walk down the isle vested In your tweed coat, its flecks like blood, Clasping books to your side, your hand Shaped more to a plough shaft than a pen, Your poems all sphagnum and scriptorium.
The book is divided into four sections, organized into four spaces or contexts in which reading occurs: Le lecteur dans sa bibliotheque (The Reader in his Library), Le lecteur dans le scriptorium (The Reader in the Scriptorium), Le lecteur dans le cabinet de l'auteur (The Reader in the Author's Study), Le lecteur dans l'atelier de l'enlumineur (The Reader in the Illuminator's Workshop).
Among his topics are the legacy of Bede, Spanish adoptionism and the Frankish reaction, the Tours scriptorium, The Old and New Testaments; cultivating prayer, theology for the laity, and the poet and his friends.