scrofula


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scrof·u·la

 (skrŏf′yə-lə)
n.
A form of tuberculosis affecting the lymph nodes, especially of the neck, that is most common in children and is usually spread by unpasteurized milk from infected cows. Also called struma.

[Middle English scrophula, from Late Latin scrōfulae, swelling of the glands, diminutive of Latin scrōfa, sow; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

scrofula

(ˈskrɒfjʊlə)
n
(Pathology) pathol (no longer in technical use) tuberculosis of the lymphatic glands. Also called (formerly): the king's evil
[C14: from Medieval Latin, from Late Latin scrōfulae swollen glands in the neck, literally: little sows (sows were thought to be particularly prone to the disease), from Latin scrōfa sow]

scrof•u•la

(ˈskrɒf yə lə)

n.
primary tuberculosis of the lymphatic glands, esp. of the neck.
[1350–1400; < Late Latin scrōfulae (Latin scrōf(a) sow), from the belief that breeding sows were susceptible]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scrofula - a form of tuberculosis characterized by swellings of the lymphatic glands
T.B., tuberculosis, TB - infection transmitted by inhalation or ingestion of tubercle bacilli and manifested in fever and small lesions (usually in the lungs but in various other parts of the body in acute stages)
Translations

scrofula

[ˈskrɒfjʊlə] Nescrófula f

scrofula

n (dated Med) → Skrofulose f, → Skrofel f

scrof·u·la

n. escrófula, tuberculosis de la glándula linfática.

scrofula

n escrófula
References in classic literature ?
There was no other attribute that so much impressed her with a sense of new and untransmitted vigour in Pearl's nature, as this never failing vivacity of spirits: she had not the disease of sadness, which almost all children, in these latter days, inherit, with the scrofula, from the troubles of their ancestors.
I judged that a sharp, bright new nickel, with a first-rate like- ness of the king on one side of it and Guenever on the other, and a blooming pious motto, would take the tuck out of scrofula as handy as a nobler coin and please the scrofulous fancy more; and I was right.
He inherited a constitution of iron, great physical strength, and fearless self-assertiveness, but also hypochondria (persistent melancholy), uncouthness of body and movement, and scrofula, which disfigured his face and greatly injured his eyesight.
In Chinese medicine Kelp (Laminaria saccharina) is recommended for the treatment of Scrofula, oedema (fluid retention), goiter (enlargement of the thyroid gland), topical tumours and swollen testicles.
Do you know that vaccines depress the body's immune system functions which makes a person susceptible and open to developing many other diseases such as all types of cancers, AIDS, autism, autoimmune disease, nervous system disorders, eye damage, cardiac complications, crohn's disease, birth defects, parkinsons, pancreatitis, allergies, alzheimers, arthritis, ADD/ADHD, blood reactions, brain damage, convulsions, cerebral palsy, kidney disorders, meningitis, immune suppression, hearing loss, gullain-barre syndrome, multiple sclerosis, skin diseases such as: syphilis, phthisis, scrofula, erysipelas, eczema and almost all diseases of the skin as well as other chronic and debilitating and, in many ways, painful immunologic and neurological disorders.
The most conspicuous way in which the Jacobite monarchs emphasised their divine calling was through the exercise of the royal touch--the God-given power to cure scrofula.
The diagnosis and treatment of scrofula (mycobacterial cervical lymphadenitis).
Richard Wiseman, surgeon to Charles II, affirmed his belief in the "royal touch" as a cure for king's evil, or scrofula, while even the learned English physician Thomas Browne stated that witches really existed.
Eight patients had a history of old tuberculosis, including pulmonary tuberculosis, bone tuberculosis, scrofula, intestinal tuberculosis, tuberculous pleuritis, tuberculous pericarditis, and tuberculosis of the parotid gland.
Born on September 18, 1709, in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England, as a child Johnson suffered from scrofula, a form of tuberculosis.
Thousands upon thousands suffer from some form of scrofula, and are afflicted with sores and ulcers, interior or exterior.
azedarach has also been used in Ayurveda (3); it is known as Bakayn in India and Pakistan, where it has been used in traditional medicine to treat leprosy, scrofula, nausea, vomiting, thirst, and eruptive skin conditions.