scrub jay


Also found in: Wikipedia.

scrub jay

or scrub-jay (skrŭb′jā)
n.
Any of several chiefly blue-and-gray jays of the genus Aphelocoma, having no crest and found in dense scrub in North and Central America, especially A. coerulescens of Florida and A. californica of Mexico and the western United States.
References in periodicals archive ?
They kill 31 million small mammals and 68 million birds a year, including threatened species such as the Florida scrub jay and the Lower Keys marsh rabbit.
Usually at this time of year my bird feeders are crowded; this year there is only one loyal scrub jay.
Cactus Flats 2013 2014 Fruits Seeds Fruits Seeds White-tailed antelope squirrel 15 18 12 30 Kangaroo rats 3 81 7 90 Pocket mice 2 25 0 8 Pinyon mouse 3 3 4 1 Merriam's chipmunk 0 0 2 0 California ground squirrel 0 0 1 1 Western scrub jay 0 0 0 0 Lone Valley 2013 2014 Fruits Seeds Fruits Seeds White-tailed antelope squirrel 15 16 7 3 Kangaroo rats 3 14 0 0 Pocket mice 2 20 0 4 Pinyon mouse 3 18 1 54 Merriam's chipmunk 0 0 0 0 California ground squirrel 0 0 0 0 Western scrub jay 0 2 0 19 Table 3.
Data was provided on bonobos, chimpanzees, gorillas, olive baboons, stump-tailed macaques, golden snub-nosed monkeys, brown, red-bellied and aye-aye lemurs, coyotes, dogs, gray wolves, Asian elephants, domestic pigeons, orange-winged amazons, Eurasian jays, western scrub jay, zebra finches and swamp sparrows.
The only available land for any new "heavy" launch vehicle or processing facilities is mostly scrub jay habitat, and all activities that impact scrub habitat on the base incur a 4:1 mitigation requirement to offset the habitat loss.
is hiring up to 25 local laborers to clear vegetation to improve Scrub Jay habitat on approximately 1,900 acres of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.
Observations and experience with the yellow-billed magpie and WNV may provide insights for other endangered corvids that have not yet been exposed to WNV, including the Hawaiian crow (Corvus hawaiiensis) and island scrub jay (Aphelocoma insularis).
Take, for instance, the scrub jay population, which is a covered under the Endangered Species Act.
The Kern River, which flows through Bakersfield, remained mostly dry during spring and summer; key bird species decreased in abundance because of the drought (overall catch of free-ranging birds in 2007 was 31% of catch at the same traps during 2006) and the previous negative effect of WNV infection; and surviving birds in key species had high herd immunity to WNV (house finch WNV seroprevalence = 22%, n = 182; western scrub jay = 44%, n = 27) acquired during previous seasons.