scupper

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scup·per 1

 (skŭp′ər)
n.
1. Nautical An opening in the side of a ship at deck level to allow water to run off.
2. An opening for draining off water, as from a floor or the roof of a building.

[Middle English scoper- (in scopernail, nail for attaching leather under a scupper to prevent dirty water from soiling the hull), probably from scopen, to scoop, from scope, a scoop; see scoop.]

scup·per 2

 (skŭp′ər)
tr.v. scup·pered, scup·per·ing, scup·pers
1. To sink (a ship) deliberately; scuttle.
2. To thwart or ruin: scupper a business deal.
3. Chiefly British To overwhelm or massacre.

[Originally British military slang, to massacre, of unknown origin (probably later influenced by scuttle).]

scupper

(ˈskʌpə)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) nautical a drain or spout allowing water on the deck of a vessel to flow overboard
2. (Building) an opening in the side of a building for draining off water
3. (Building) a drain in a factory floor for running off the water from a sprinkler system
[C15 skopper, of uncertain origin; perhaps related to scoop]

scupper

(ˈskʌpə)
vb (tr)
1. slang to overwhelm, ruin, or disable
2. (Nautical Terms) to sink (one's ship) deliberately
[C19: of unknown origin]

scup•per

(ˈskʌp ər)

n.
1. an opening at the edge of a ship's deck that allows accumulated water to drain away into the sea or into the bilges.
2. a drain, closed by one or two flaps, for allowing water from the sprinkler system of a factory or the like to run off a floor of the building to the exterior.
3. any opening in the side of a building, as in a parapet, for draining off rainwater.
[1475–85; earlier skoper]

scupper


Past participle: scuppered
Gerund: scuppering

Imperative
scupper
scupper
Present
I scupper
you scupper
he/she/it scuppers
we scupper
you scupper
they scupper
Preterite
I scuppered
you scuppered
he/she/it scuppered
we scuppered
you scuppered
they scuppered
Present Continuous
I am scuppering
you are scuppering
he/she/it is scuppering
we are scuppering
you are scuppering
they are scuppering
Present Perfect
I have scuppered
you have scuppered
he/she/it has scuppered
we have scuppered
you have scuppered
they have scuppered
Past Continuous
I was scuppering
you were scuppering
he/she/it was scuppering
we were scuppering
you were scuppering
they were scuppering
Past Perfect
I had scuppered
you had scuppered
he/she/it had scuppered
we had scuppered
you had scuppered
they had scuppered
Future
I will scupper
you will scupper
he/she/it will scupper
we will scupper
you will scupper
they will scupper
Future Perfect
I will have scuppered
you will have scuppered
he/she/it will have scuppered
we will have scuppered
you will have scuppered
they will have scuppered
Future Continuous
I will be scuppering
you will be scuppering
he/she/it will be scuppering
we will be scuppering
you will be scuppering
they will be scuppering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been scuppering
you have been scuppering
he/she/it has been scuppering
we have been scuppering
you have been scuppering
they have been scuppering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been scuppering
you will have been scuppering
he/she/it will have been scuppering
we will have been scuppering
you will have been scuppering
they will have been scuppering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been scuppering
you had been scuppering
he/she/it had been scuppering
we had been scuppering
you had been scuppering
they had been scuppering
Conditional
I would scupper
you would scupper
he/she/it would scupper
we would scupper
you would scupper
they would scupper
Past Conditional
I would have scuppered
you would have scuppered
he/she/it would have scuppered
we would have scuppered
you would have scuppered
they would have scuppered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scupper - drain that allows water on the deck of a vessel to flow overboard
drainpipe, waste pipe, drain - a pipe through which liquid is carried away
Verb1.scupper - wait in hiding to attackscupper - wait in hiding to attack    
wait - stay in one place and anticipate or expect something; "I had to wait on line for an hour to get the tickets"
2.scupper - put in a dangerous, disadvantageous, or difficult position
affect, bear upon, impact, bear on, touch on, touch - have an effect upon; "Will the new rules affect me?"
compromise - expose or make liable to danger, suspicion, or disrepute; "The nuclear secrets of the state were compromised by the spy"

scupper

verb (Brit. slang) destroy, ruin, wreck, defeat, overwhelm, disable, overthrow, demolish, undo, torpedo, put paid to, discomfit The entire deal will be scuppered.
Translations
pilataromuttaavalumisaukko

scupper

[ˈskʌpəʳ]
A. N (Naut) → imbornal m
B. VT
1. (Naut) → abrir los imbornales de, barrenar
2. (Brit) [+ plan] → echar por tierra

scupper

[ˈskʌpər] vt (British)
(= cause to fail) [+ plans, talks] → faire capoter; [+ hopes, chance] → anéantir
(= scuttle) [+ boat, ship] → saborder

scupper

nSpeigatt nt
vt
(Naut) → versenken
(Brit inf: = ruin) → zerschlagen; if he finds out, we’ll be scupperedwenn er das erfährt, sind wir erledigt (inf)

scupper

[ˈskʌpəʳ] vt (Naut) → autoaffondare (Brit) (fig) (plan) → far naufragare
References in classic literature ?
Had you stepped on board the Pequod at a certain juncture of this post-mortemizing of the whale; and had you strolled forward nigh the windlass, pretty sure am I that you would have scanned with no small curiosity a very strange, enigmatical object, which you would have seen there, lying along lengthwise in the lee scuppers.
Because the thing did not fight back, because it was abject and whining, because it was helpless under him, he abandoned the attack, disengaging himself from the top of the tangle into which he had slid in the lee scuppers.
The HISPANIOLA was rolling scuppers under in the ocean swell.
The ape-man hurled the two sailors across the deck, where they rolled, stunned and terrified, into the scuppers upon the opposite side, and with an exclamation of incredulity gathered the girl into his arms.
But Jerry, at that moment, lay cuddled beside Villa Kennan's sleeping-cot on the slant deck of the Ariel, as that trim craft, the Shortlands astern and New Guinea dead ahead, heeled her scuppers a-whisper and garrulous to the sea-welter alongside as she logged her eleven knots under the press of the freshening trades.
I had been swept against the galley and around the steerage companion-way from the weather side into the lee scuppers.
The scuppers of the brig gurgled softly all together when the water rising against her sides subsided sleepily with a low wash, as if playing about an immovable rock.
Nobs braced himself with all four feet to keep from slipping into the scuppers and looked up into my face with a questioning whine.
The fishing boats are racing for home, and rise and dip in the ground swell as they sweep into the harbour, bending to the scuppers.