scurvy


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scur·vy

 (skûr′vē)
n.
A disease caused by deficiency of vitamin C, characterized by spongy and bleeding gums, bleeding under the skin, and extreme weakness.
adj. scur·vi·er, scur·vi·est
Mean; contemptible.

[From Middle English scurfy, characterized by scurf (influenced by French scorbut, scurvy), from scurf, scurf; see scurf.]

scur′vi·ly adv.
scur′vi·ness n.

scurvy

(ˈskɜːvɪ)
n
(Pathology) a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C, characterized by anaemia, spongy gums, bleeding beneath the skin, and (in infants) malformation of bones and teeth.
adj, -vier or -viest
mean or despicable: a scurvy knave.
[C16: see scurf]
ˈscurvily adv
ˈscurviness n

scur•vy

(ˈskɜr vi)

n., adj. -vi•er, -vi•est. n.
1. a disease marked by swollen and bleeding gums, livid spots on the skin, and prostration and caused by a lack of vitamin C.
adj.
2. contemptible; despicable.
[1555–65; scurf + -y1]
scur′vi•ly, adv.
scur′vi•ness, n.

scur·vy

(skûr′vē)
A disease caused by lack of vitamin C in the diet. It is characterized by bleeding of the gums, rupture of capillaries under the skin, loose teeth, and weakness of the body.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scurvy - a condition caused by deficiency of ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
avitaminosis, hypovitaminosis - any of several diseases caused by deficiency of one or more vitamins
Adj.1.scurvy - of the most contemptible kindscurvy - of the most contemptible kind; "abject cowardice"; "a low stunt to pull"; "a low-down sneak"; "his miserable treatment of his family"; "You miserable skunk!"; "a scummy rabble"; "a scurvy trick"
contemptible - deserving of contempt or scorn

scurvy

adjective (Old-fashioned) contemptible, mean, bad, low, base, rotten, sorry, worthless, shabby, vile, low-down (informal), pitiful, abject, despicable, dishonourable, ignoble, scabby (informal) It was a scurvy trick to play.
Related words
adjective scorbutic
Translations
keripukki
skyrbjúgur
skörbjugg

scurvy

[ˈskɜːvɪ]
A. ADJvil, canallesco
B. Nescorbuto m

scurvy

[ˈskɜːrvi] nscorbut m

scurvy

nSkorbut m
adj (obs) knaveschändlich

scurvy

[ˈskɜːvɪ] nscorbuto

scur·vy

n. escorbuto, enfermedad causada por deficiencia de vitamina C que se manifiesta con anemia, encías sangrantes y un estado general de laxitud.

scurvy

n escorbuto
References in classic literature ?
He had before served me a scurvy trick, which set the queen a-laughing, although at the same time she was heartily vexed, and would have immediately cashiered him, if I had not been so generous as to intercede.
You are a stupid, scurvy innkeeper," said Don Quixote, and putting spurs to Rocinante and bringing his pike to the slope he rode out of the inn before anyone could stop him, and pushed on some distance without looking to see if his squire was following him.
Remorse for a scurvy act, and an honorable desire to right the wrong he had done the woman he now knew he really loved had excited these germs to rapid growth in Morison Baynes--and the metamorphosis had taken place.
They would shave off her hair, feed her on a scanty allowance of rice, treat her with contempt; she would be looked upon as an unclean creature, and would die in some corner, like a scurvy dog.
I am in half a mind to thrash you, in which case you will be the first to reap the fruits of your scurvy knavery.
Fair ladies, brave knights, churls, varlets, squires, scurvy knaves, men-at-arms, malapert rogues--all were merry.
After four breakfasts and a gallon of champagne, to serve us such a scurvy trick.
They were blown hither and thither for two months, until sick and dying of scurvy, starvation, and thirst, they had been wrecked on a small islet.
my dear friend, there is bravery in facing scurvy, dysentery, locusts, poisoned arrows, as my ancestor St.
Now a murrain seize thee and thy news, thou scurvy dog," quoth the Tinker, "for thou speakest but ill of good men.
The children had discovered the glittering hoard, and when in a mischievous mood used to fling showers of moidores, diamonds, pearls and pieces of eight to the gulls, who pounced upon them for food, and then flew away, raging at the scurvy trick that had been played upon them.
At the bar, which ranged along one side of the large chinked-log room, leaned half a dozen men, two of whom were discussing the relative merits of spruce-tea and lime-juice as remedies for scurvy.