scuttle


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scut·tle 1

 (skŭt′l)
n.
1. A small opening or hatch with a movable lid in the deck or hull of a ship or in the roof, wall, or floor of a building.
2. The lid or hatch of such an opening.
tr.v. scut·tled, scut·tling, scut·tles
1. Nautical
a. To cut or open a hole or holes in (a ship's hull).
b. To sink (a ship) by this means.
2. To thwart, ruin, or terminate: "a program [the] President ... sought to scuttle" (Christian Science Monitor).

[Middle English skottell, from Old French escoutille, possibly from Spanish escotilla.]

scut·tle 2

 (skŭt′l)
n.
1. A metal pail for carrying coal.
2. A shallow open basket for carrying vegetables, flowers, or grain.

[Middle English scutel, basket, from Old English, dish, from Latin scutella; see scullery.]

scut·tle 3

 (skŭt′l)
intr.v. scut·tled, scut·tling, scut·tles
To run or move with short hurried movements; scurry.
n.
A hurried run.

[Middle English scottlen; possibly akin to scud.]

scuttle

(ˈskʌtəl)
n
2. dialect chiefly Brit a shallow basket, esp for carrying vegetables
3. (Automotive Engineering) the part of a motor-car body lying immediately behind the bonnet
[Old English scutel trencher, from Latin scutella bowl, diminutive of scutra platter; related to Old Norse skutill, Old High German scuzzila, perhaps to Latin scūtum shield]

scuttle

(ˈskʌtəl)
vb
(intr) to run or move about with short hasty steps
n
a hurried pace or run
[C15: perhaps from scud, influenced by shuttle]

scuttle

(ˈskʌtəl)
vb
1. (Nautical Terms) (tr) nautical to cause (a vessel) to sink by opening the seacocks or making holes in the bottom
2. (tr) to give up (hopes, plans, etc)
n
(Nautical Terms) nautical a small hatch or its cover
[C15 (n): via Old French from Spanish escotilla a small opening, from escote opening in a piece of cloth, from escotar to cut out]

scut•tle1

(ˈskʌt l)

n.
1. a deep bucket for carrying coal.
2. a broad, shallow basket.
[before 1050; Middle English; Old English scutel dish, trencher, platter < Latin scutella, diminutive of scutra shallow pan]

scut•tle2

(ˈskʌt l)

v. -tled, -tling,
n. v.i.
1. to run with short, quick steps; scurry.
n.
2. a quick pace.
3. a short, hurried run.
[1400–50; late Middle English scottlynge (ger.), variant of scuddle, frequentative of scud1]

scut•tle3

(ˈskʌt l)

n., v. -tled, -tling. n.
1.
a. a small hatch or port in the deck, side, or bottom of a vessel.
b. a cover for this.
2. a small hatchlike opening in a roof or ceiling.
v.t.
3. to sink (a vessel) deliberately by opening seacocks or making openings in the bottom.
4. to abandon or destroy (plans, rumors, etc.).
[1490–1500; perhaps « Sp escotilla hatchway, derivative of escot(e) a cutting of cloth]

scuttle


Past participle: scuttled
Gerund: scuttling

Imperative
scuttle
scuttle
Present
I scuttle
you scuttle
he/she/it scuttles
we scuttle
you scuttle
they scuttle
Preterite
I scuttled
you scuttled
he/she/it scuttled
we scuttled
you scuttled
they scuttled
Present Continuous
I am scuttling
you are scuttling
he/she/it is scuttling
we are scuttling
you are scuttling
they are scuttling
Present Perfect
I have scuttled
you have scuttled
he/she/it has scuttled
we have scuttled
you have scuttled
they have scuttled
Past Continuous
I was scuttling
you were scuttling
he/she/it was scuttling
we were scuttling
you were scuttling
they were scuttling
Past Perfect
I had scuttled
you had scuttled
he/she/it had scuttled
we had scuttled
you had scuttled
they had scuttled
Future
I will scuttle
you will scuttle
he/she/it will scuttle
we will scuttle
you will scuttle
they will scuttle
Future Perfect
I will have scuttled
you will have scuttled
he/she/it will have scuttled
we will have scuttled
you will have scuttled
they will have scuttled
Future Continuous
I will be scuttling
you will be scuttling
he/she/it will be scuttling
we will be scuttling
you will be scuttling
they will be scuttling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been scuttling
you have been scuttling
he/she/it has been scuttling
we have been scuttling
you have been scuttling
they have been scuttling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been scuttling
you will have been scuttling
he/she/it will have been scuttling
we will have been scuttling
you will have been scuttling
they will have been scuttling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been scuttling
you had been scuttling
he/she/it had been scuttling
we had been scuttling
you had been scuttling
they had been scuttling
Conditional
I would scuttle
you would scuttle
he/she/it would scuttle
we would scuttle
you would scuttle
they would scuttle
Past Conditional
I would have scuttled
you would have scuttled
he/she/it would have scuttled
we would have scuttled
you would have scuttled
they would have scuttled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scuttle - container for coalscuttle - container for coal; shaped to permit pouring the coal onto the fire
container - any object that can be used to hold things (especially a large metal boxlike object of standardized dimensions that can be loaded from one form of transport to another)
2.scuttle - an entrance equipped with a hatchscuttle - an entrance equipped with a hatch; especially a passageway between decks of a ship
entrance, entranceway, entryway, entree, entry - something that provides access (to get in or get out); "they waited at the entrance to the garden"; "beggars waited just outside the entryway to the cathedral"
escape hatch - hatchway that provides a means of escape in an emergency
hatch - a movable barrier covering a hatchway
Verb1.scuttle - to move about or proceed hurriedly; "so terrified by the extraordinary ebbing of the sea that they scurried to higher ground"
crab - scurry sideways like a crab
run - move fast by using one's feet, with one foot off the ground at any given time; "Don't run--you'll be out of breath"; "The children ran to the store"

scuttle

verb
1. run, scurry, scamper, rush, hurry, scramble, hare (Brit. informal), bustle, beetle, scud, hasten, scoot, scutter (Brit. informal) Two very small children scuttled away.
2. wreck, destroy, ruin, overwhelm, disable, overthrow, foil, undo, torpedo, put paid to, discomfit Such threats could scuttle the peace conference.
Translations
يَفُرُّ، يُسْرِعُ بِخُطُواتٍ قَصيرَه
cupitatpotopit
pilesænke
gera gat á skipsbotn til aî sökkva òvískjótast, hraîa sér
muktnogremdēt kuģisteigties

scuttle

1 [ˈskʌtl] VT
1. [+ ship] → barrenar
2. (fig) [+ hopes, plans] → dar al traste con, echar por tierra

scuttle

2 [ˈskʌtl] VI (= run) → echar a correr
to scuttle away or offescabullirse
to scuttle alongcorrer, ir a toda prisa
we must scuttletenemos que marcharnos

scuttle

3 [ˈskʌtl] N (for coal) → cubo m, carbonera f

scuttle

[ˈskʌtəl]
n
(NAUTICAL, NAVAL)écoutille f
(also coal scuttle) → seau m (à charbon)
vt
(= scupper) [+ ship] → saborder
[+ plans, proposals, hopes] → abandonner
vi (= scamper) → détaler, s'enfuir à toutes jambes
scuttle away
scuttle off vis'enfuir à toutes jambes, détaler

scuttle

1
n (= coal scuttle)Kohleneimer m

scuttle

2
vi (person)trippeln; (animals)hoppeln; (spiders, crabs etc)krabbeln; she/it scuttled off in a hurrysie/es flitzte davon

scuttle

3 (Naut)
nLuke f
vt
(fig) treaty, agreement, talkssprengen; planskaputt machen

scuttle

1 [ˈskʌtl]
1. vt (ship) → autoaffondare
2. n
a. (Naut) → portellino
b. (also coal scuttle) → secchio del carbone

scuttle

2 [ˈskʌtl] vi to scuttle away or offfilare via
to scuttle in → entrare precipitosamente

scuttle1

(ˈskatl) verb
to hurry with short, quick steps.

scuttle2

(ˈskatl) verb
(of a ship's crew) to make a hole in (the ship) in order to sink it. The sailors scuttled the ship to prevent it falling into enemy hands.
References in classic literature ?
Going forward to the forecastle, we found the slide of the scuttle open.
Why, diving after the slowly descending head, Queequeg with his keen sword had made side lunges near its bottom, so as to scuttle a large hole there; then dropping his sword, had thrust his long arm far inwards and upwards, and so hauled out our poor Tash by the head.
Next you buckle your greaves on your legs, and your cuisses on your thighs; then come your backplate and your breastplate, and you begin to feel crowded; then you hitch onto the breastplate the half-petticoat of broad overlapping bands of steel which hangs down in front but is scolloped out behind so you can sit down, and isn't any real improvement on an inverted coal scuttle, either for looks or for wear, or to wipe your hands on; next you belt on your sword; then you put your stove-pipe joints onto your arms, your iron gauntlets onto your hands, your iron rat-trap onto your head, with a rag of steel web hitched onto it to hang over the back of your neck -- and there you are, snug as a candle in a candle-mould.
There was a garret above, pierced with a scuttle over his head; and down through this scuttle came a cat, suspended around the haunches by a string; she had a rag tied about her head and jaws to keep her from mewing; as she slowly descended she curved upward and clawed at the string, she swung downward and clawed at the intangible air.
Donnithorne--he always came first, the wrinkled small old man, peering round with short-sighted glances at the bowing and curtsying congregation; then she knew Miss Lydia was passing, and though Hetty liked so much to look at her fashionable little coal- scuttle bonnet, with the wreath of small roses round it, she didn't mind it to-day.
The idea of losing that sixty thousand dollars, of letting it utterly slide and scuttle and never hearing of it again, seemed the sweetest thing in the world.
We could hear the dry rushing scuttle of long bodies running over the baggy cloth.
Can you remember those glorious days of fresh young manhood--how, when coming home along the moonlit road, we felt too full of life for sober walking, and had to spring and skip, and wave our arms, and shout till belated farmers' wives thought--and with good reason, too--that we were mad, and kept close to the hedge, while we stood and laughed aloud to see them scuttle off so fast and made their blood run cold with a wild parting whoop, and the tears came, we knew not why?
All round this garden, in the uncultivated parts, red partridges ran about in conveys among the brambles and tufts of junipers, and at every step of the comte and Raoul a terrified rabbit quitted his thyme and heath to scuttle away to the burrow.
An' I meean as the King 'ull put a stop to 't, for them say it as knows it, as there's to be a Rinform, and them landlords as never done the right thing by their tenants 'ull be treated i' that way as they'll hev to scuttle off.
Her feet were stuck up on the coal scuttle, and she had a tumblerful of some reddish-brown composition on the smoking table close at her elbow.
He awoke kicking the offended foot, and gazed at the cockroach that did not scuttle, but that walked dignifiedly away.