sea change

(redirected from sea changes)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

sea change

n.
1. A change caused by the sea: "Of his bones are coral made: / Those are pearls that were his eyes: / Nothing of him that doth fade, / But doth suffer a sea change" (Shakespeare).
2. A marked transformation: "The script suffered considerable sea changes, particularly in structure" (Harold Pinter).

sea change

n
a seemingly magical change, as brought about by the action of the sea
[coined by Shakespeare, in Ariel's song 'Full Fathom Five' in The Tempest (1611)]

sea′ change`


n.
a major transformation or alteration.
[1600–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sea change - a profound transformation
transformation, transmutation, shift - a qualitative change
References in periodicals archive ?
At least three such sea changes have taken place in human history: the rise of agriculture, the emergence of the major Eastern and Western religious traditions, and the Copernican realization that the Earth is not the center of the universe.
Interestingly Sea Changes originally began as a fiction blog titled Peggy Finds a Friend.
Her mother may have grown up there, but to Lise there are many new terrors: a big ocean, a series of strange sea changes her family is experiencing.
Second, we simply do not have the time for "slowly creating groundswells that eventually lead to sea changes.
In yet another breakdown, the authors contend that ambitious leaders are created during three technological sea changes.
Directed by feature filmmaker Roger Spottiswoode (``Tomorrow Never Dies,'' ``Under Fire'') from a script by Texas journalist Lawrence Wright (who recently released a novel, ``God's Favorite,'' which follows his screenplay fairly closely and handles the sea changes in sensibility more deftly), the film begins with a framing sequence: Noriega in a confessional.
But the very first of these sea changes of reputation did not occur with Sadler's Wells Ballet, NYCB, Martha Graham, or any of the others.
discounts that possibility saying that sea changes outside the tropical Pacific do not strongly affect US.