seafaring


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sea·far·ing

 (sē′fâr′ĭng)
n.
A sailor's calling.
adj.
1. Following a life at sea: seafaring peoples of the world; seafaring nations.
2. Fit to travel on the sea; seagoing: seafaring vessels.

seafaring

(ˈsiːˌfɛərɪŋ)
adj (prenominal)
1. travelling by sea
2. (Nautical Terms) working as a sailor
n
3. (Nautical Terms) the act of travelling by sea
4. (Nautical Terms) the career or work of a sailor

sea•far•ing

(ˈsiˌfɛər ɪŋ)

adj.
1. traveling by sea.
2. following the sea as a trade, business, or calling.
3. of, pertaining to, or occurring during a voyage on the sea.
n.
4. the calling of a sailor.
[1150–1200]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seafaring - the work of a sailorseafaring - the work of a sailor      
leg - (nautical) the distance traveled by a sailing vessel on a single tack
cabotage - navigation in coastal waters
tacking, tack - (nautical) the act of changing tack
employment, work - the occupation for which you are paid; "he is looking for employment"; "a lot of people are out of work"
steerage, steering - the act of steering a ship
accommodation ladder - (nautical) a portable ladder hung over the side of a vessel to give access to small boats alongside
becket - (nautical) a short line with an eye at one end and a knot at the other; used to secure loose items on a ship
bilge well - (nautical) a well where seepage drains to be pumped away
bitter end - (nautical) the inboard end of a line or cable especially the end that is wound around a bitt
chip - a triangular wooden float attached to the end of a log line
deadeye - (nautical) a round hardwood disk with holes and a grooved perimeter used to tighten a shroud
escutcheon - (nautical) a plate on a ship's stern on which the name is inscribed
jack ladder, pilot ladder, Jacob's ladder - (nautical) a hanging ladder of ropes or chains supporting wooden or metal rungs or steps
laniard, lanyard - (nautical) a line used for extending or fastening rigging on ships
lead line, sounding line - (nautical) plumb line for determining depth
luff - (nautical) the forward edge of a fore-and-aft sail that is next to the mast
overhead - (nautical) the top surface of an enclosed space on a ship
ratlin, ratline - (nautical) a small horizontal rope between the shrouds of a sailing ship; they form a ladder for climbing aloft
rudder - (nautical) steering mechanism consisting of a hinged vertical plate mounted at the stern of a vessel
sea ladder, sea steps - (nautical) ladder to be lowered over a ship's side for coming aboard
mainsheet, weather sheet, shroud, tack, sheet - (nautical) a line (rope or chain) that regulates the angle at which a sail is set in relation to the wind
spun yarn - (nautical) small stuff consisting of a lightweight rope made of several rope yarns loosely wound together
stay - (nautical) brace consisting of a heavy rope or wire cable used as a support for a mast or spar
sternpost - (nautical) the principal upright timber at the stern of a vessel
fireroom, stokehold, stokehole - (nautical) chamber or compartment in which the furnaces of a ship are stoked or fired
towing line, towing rope, towline, towrope - (nautical) a rope used in towing
capsizing - (nautical) the event of a boat accidentally turning over in the water
beam-ends - (nautical) at the ends of the transverse deck beams of a vessel; "on her beam-ends" means heeled over on the side so that the deck is almost vertical
ship's bell, bell - (nautical) each of the eight half-hour units of nautical time signaled by strokes of a ship's bell; eight bells signals 4:00, 8:00, or 12:00 o'clock, either a.m. or p.m.
steerageway - (nautical) the minimum rate of motion needed for a vessel to be maneuvered
stand out - steer away from shore, of ships
starboard - turn to the right, of helms or rudders
fore - situated at or toward the bow of a vessel
rigged - fitted or equipped with necessary rigging (sails and shrouds and stays etc)
unrigged - stripped of rigging
close to the wind - nearly opposite to the direction from which wind is coming; "sailing close to the wind"
2.seafaring - travel by waterseafaring - travel by water      
travel, traveling, travelling - the act of going from one place to another; "he enjoyed selling but he hated the travel"
ocean trip, voyage - an act of traveling by water
sailing - riding in a sailboat
boating, yachting - water travel for pleasure
shipwreck - cause to experience shipwreck; "They were shipwrecked in one of the mysteries at sea"
Adj.1.seafaring - used on the high seas; "seafaring vessels"
marine - relating to or characteristic of or occurring on or in the sea

seafaring

adjective nautical, marine, naval, maritime, oceanic a seafaring vessel
Translations
مُسافِر بَحْرا
mořeplavecký
søfarendesøfarts-
sem varîar sjómennsku
moreplavecký
denizcigemici

seafaring

[ˈsiːˌfɛərɪŋ]
A. ADJ [community] → marinero; [life] → de marinero
seafaring manmarinero m
B. N (also seafaring life) → vida f de marinero

seafaring

[ˈsiːfɛərɪŋ]
nnavigation f
adj [life] → de marin
seafaring people → gens mpl de mersea fish npoisson m de mersea floor nfond m de la mer

seafaring

[ˈsiːˌfɛərɪŋ] adj (community) → marinaro/a; (life) → da marinaio

sea

(siː) noun
1. (often with the) the mass of salt water covering most of the Earth's surface. I enjoy swimming in the sea; over land and sea; The sea is very deep here; (also adjective) A whale is a type of large sea animal.
2. a particular area of sea. the Baltic Sea; These fish are found in tropical seas.
3. a particular state of the sea. mountainous seas.
ˈseaward(s) adverb
towards the sea; away from the land. The yacht left the harbour and sailed seawards.
ˈseaboard noun
the seacoast. the eastern seaboard of the United States.
sea breeze
a breeze blowing from the sea towards the land.
ˈseafaring adjective
of work or travel on ships. a seafaring man.
ˈseafood noun
fish, especially shellfish.
adjective
seafood restaurants.
ˈseafront noun
a promenade or part of a town with its buildings facing the sea.
ˈsea-going adjective
designed and equipped for travelling on the sea. a sea-going yacht.
ˈseagull noun
a gull.
sea level
the level of the surface of the sea used as a base from which the height of land can be measured. three hundred metres above sea level.
ˈsea-lion noun
a type of large seal.
ˈseamanplural ˈseamen noun
a sailor, especially a member of a ship's crew who is not an officer.
ˈseaport noun
a port on the coast.
ˈseashell noun
the (empty) shell of a sea creature.
ˈseashore noun
the land close to the sea.
ˈseasick adjective
ill because of the motion of a ship at sea. Were you seasick on the voyage?
ˈseasickness noun
ˈseaside noun
(usually with the) a place beside the sea. We like to go to the seaside in the summer.
ˈseaweed noun
plants growing in the sea. The beach was covered with seaweed.
ˈseaworthy adjective
(negative unseaworthy) (of a ship) suitably built and in good enough condition to sail at sea.
ˈseaworthiness noun
at sea
1. on a ship and away from land. He has been at sea for four months.
2. puzzled or bewildered. Can I help you? You seem all at sea.
go to sea
to become a sailor. He wants to go to sea.
put to sea
to leave the land or a port. They planned to put to sea the next day.
References in classic literature ?
It remarkably characterised the incomplete morality of the age, rigid as we call it, that a licence was allowed the seafaring class, not merely for their freaks on shore, but for far more desperate deeds on their proper element.
She found him out in private seafaring anxieties and unutterable seafaring exultations which he had kept a secret from his own mate.
As he was at present dressed in a seafaring slop suit, in which he looked as if he had some parrots and cigars to dispose of, I next discussed with him what dress he should wear.
Every day when he came back from his stroll he would ask if any seafaring men had gone by along the road.
Not to mention rumours which agitated the maritime population and excited the public mind, even in the interior of continents, seafaring men were particularly excited.
He hardly met the finest type of mankind in that seafaring village of Spanish mongrels.
Thus sang the bard, and both Ulysses and the seafaring Phaeacians were charmed as they heard him.
They were chiefly laborers and seafaring men, together with many young apprentices, and all those idle people about town who are ready for any kind of mischief.
Thasus was the son of a seafaring person in the neighborhood; he had been brought up with the young princes, and was their intimate friend, and loved Europa very much; so they consented that he should accompany them.
Such is an outline of the history of Governor Young, as furnished by himself; and we regret that we are not able to give any account of the state maintained by this seafaring worthy, and the manner in which he discharged his high functions; though it is evident he had more of the hearty familiarity of the forecastle than the dignity of the gubernatorial office.
Some joker had written to him about a seafaring man with some such name who was sup- posed to be hanging about some girl or other, either in Colebrook or in the neighbourhood.
And by this time they had lighted their cigars and put on all manner of seafaring caps, some of them with big ear-lappets which somehow had the effect of bringing out their peculiar facial type.